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07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
New views from Cassini’s weekly dives between Saturn and its rings ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
The small but unique study is testing whether jogging memories where they were made can help older African-Americans stay mentally sharp and slow early memory loss. Black seniors appear to have twice the risk of whites, and researchers are looking for ways to stop cognitive decline as they get older. ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Seeing Machines street sign ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Eye tracking technology ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Technology used in mining industry ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
After their wings or tails get captured by the silver screen, animal stars often fail to receive the lion's share of rewards. Fame doesn't guarantee success or a comfortable lifestyle for the furry stars of notable films. Instead, unique difficulties...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Microsoft Paint has finally lost its battle with advancing technology at the ripe old age of 32. Graphic design will never be the same again, mourns Kyle Venktess. ......
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Hutton Communications now offering SIAE Microelettronica's complete portfolio of North American Microwave and Millimeter Wave Backhaul Products July 25, 2017, Dallas, TX. - SIAE MICROELECTTRONICA, Inc. a leading supplier and innovator of licensed microwave backhaul solutions announced today that its products are now available in North America through Hutton Communications. Along with distribution of SIAE MICROELETTRONICA's wireless backhaul solutions, Hutton Communications...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Expanded partnership to help 'even the odds' of survival for children with cancer in the Philippines, Myanmar, Mexico and Ghana In developed countries, the survival rate for childhood cancer is 80%, while in developing countries it can be as low as 10% Sandoz is committed to working with key stakeholders to pioneer novel ways of expanding access to healthcare The digital press release with multimedia content can be accessed here: Holzkirchen, July 25, 2017- Sandoz today announces the expansion of a pilot project with leading charity World Child Cancer, aimed at improving access to treatment and optimizing survival outcomes for children suffering from cancer in four developing countries. Jon...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Yokogawa to Release ProSafe®-RS SIL2 Wireless Gas Detection System - Offering of a total system solution, including consulting and engineering - Left: ProSafe-RS, Right: YFGW510 GS01 Yokogawa Electric Corporation (TOKYO: 6841) announces that it will release the ProSafe-RS®SIL2*1wireless gas detection system in September. The ProSafe-RS SIL2 wireless gas detection system will consist of a newly enhanced version of the Yokogawa ProSafe-RS SIL3 safety instrumented system (R4.03.10), Yokogawa field wireless network devices, annunciator panels, and GasSecure*2GS01 or GS01-EA*3wireless gas detectors. For this system, Yokogawa will establish a total solution that will include both consulting and...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
When Blueprint Robotics co-founder and Senior Vice President Karim Sahyoun visited a close friend in Munich, he was impressed of the excellent quality and precision of his host's residential house. The 450 m² building was produced by a WEINMANN customer, the renowned German prefab house manufacturer WeberHaus. After the architectural plans and pictures of the house being installed were shown to Karim, the entrepreneur's interest in this construction method was aroused even more. Karim describes this initial experience as if it occurred yesterday, 'Given how different construction can sometimes be in the US, I was absolutely blown away. The house felt so sturdy, compared to our homes in the...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
The Company will be hosting a conference call at 9:00 am Eastern Time(6:00am Pacific Time, 2:00pmUK time, 4:00pmIsraeltime). On the call, management will review and discuss the results and will be available to answer questions. To participate, please call one of the following teleconferencing numbers. Please begin placing your calls a few minutes before the conference call commences. If you are unable to connect using the toll-free numbers, please try the international dial-in number. US Dial-in Number:...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
8 May 2017 | CBI Scotland Update In this month's Member Spotlight, CBI Scotland asked Gilead Sciences to explain how policymakers in the UK and Scotland alike can work with industry to encourage investment and dialogue on delivering new medicines. Scotland prides itself on being a world leader in health and innovation, conscious that proper care for its ageing population requires significant innovation and financial support. Integrated health and social care is already to cost £8 billion, and it recognises some daunting challenges. Figures from the Scottish Government indicate that about two million Scots already live with a long-term condition and health and social care costs are expected...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
2017 ANNUAL REPORT Fiscal year ended March 31, 2017 Financial Summary CONTENTS Five-Year Summary 2 Analysis of Operating Results 3 Business and Other Risks 5 Consolidated Balance Sheets 6 Consolidated Statements of Income 8 Consolidated Statements of Comprehensive Income 9 Consolidated Statements of Changes in Net Assets 10 Consolidated Statements of Cash Flows 12 Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements 13 Independent Auditor's Report 41 Five-Year Summary FUJI MACHINE MFG. CO., LTD and Consolidated Subsidiaries Years ended March 31 Millions of yen Thousands of U.S. dollars (Note) 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2017 For the Year Orders ¥ 62,783 ¥ 68,269 ¥ 92,019 ¥ 82,651 ¥ 94,024 $ 839,500 Net...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called 'fluxons', are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed and, at the same time, produce much less heat dissipation. Physicists around Wolfgang Lang at the University of Vienna and their colleagues at the Johannes-Kepler-University Linz have now succeeded in producing a 'quantum egg-box' with a novel and simple method. They realized a stable and regular arrangement of hundreds of thousands of fluxons - a groundbreaking progress for circuits based on fluxons. The results appear in the new journal 'Physical Review Applied' of the...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Purpose-built to offer unparalleled flexibility in the most demanding and extreme mobile working environments Panasonic today announced the next-generation Toughbook CF-33 - the first fully-rugged 2-in-1 detachable laptop of its kind, redefining rugged flexibility for those who work in demanding conditions. The Toughbook CF-33 detachable laptop offers the best of all worlds for mobile workers; a fully rugged laptop with a detachable keyboard, and larger display tablet featuring a 3:2 aspect ratio - a world first in a fully rugged product - that can be used in multiple modes to meet a variety of business needs. The device is ideally suited to a number of demanding industries, such as...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Release Date: Jul. 25, 2017 Publisher: Shiseido Technology / R&D Shiseido Awards Recepients of the 10th Shiseido Female Researcher Science Grant -Creating ideal work environment for female researchers to continue their research activities- Shiseido Company, Limited (hereinafter 'Shiseido') held the grand award ceremony of the 10th Shiseido Female Researcher Science Grant on Friday, July 7, at Shiodome FS Building, Tokyo. Shiseido's corporate executive officer and chief research and development officer, Mr. Yoichi Shimatani, presented a grant of one million yen to ten recipients, respectively. Shiseido...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
ASX/Media Announcement 25 July 2017 GENERAL MEETING - WITHDRAWAL OF RESOLUTION 3 Pilbara Minerals Limited (ASX: PLS) ("Company") advises that it has today withdrawn "Resolution 3 - Approval for Placement of Shortfall under the Share Purchase Plan" from the agenda of the General Meeting of Shareholders scheduled for 10.00am (WST) on 26 July 2017. Following the heavy oversubscription of the Company's recent Share Purchase Plan (SPP) as announced on 18 July 2017, the Board of the Company has determined that it is no longer...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
High level of processing accuracy, diversity and flexibility with the highest degree of efficiency and consistency in production: Josef Lehmann Holzbau AG required a new and innovative CNC solution in element production. The result: a system concept that is setting new standards by bringing together two processes on one work station and fostering interaction between hardware and software. An article from the WEINMANN customer magazine Performance, Version 16/ 2017. Here you can read the . For many years, Josef Lehmann Holzbau AG has been built on craftsmanship and extensive experience. Add to this a willingness to continuously adapt knowledge and infrastructure to technical progress and to...
07/25/2017   WorldNews Science
Enjoy the latest slim, stylish design in your home or apartment, with Panasonic's sleek new 'Aero Series' Air Conditioners - the latest in Panasonic's popular range. The Panasonic Aero Series features a new slim design and is narrower in depth, projecting less from the wall to blend more subtly with home interiors. This new styling has seen Panasonic receive an IF Design Award in Europe. The unit features an elegant gloss white finish and gently rounded horizontal panel with two tapered sides. To complement its attractive design, the Aero Series provides comfort and peace of mind with controlled airflow, purified healthy air and smart energy savings. The new Air Conditioner range includes...
07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Robots, race cars and weather: Girl Scouts offer new badgesGirl Scouts from tiny Daisies to teen Ambassadors may earn 23 new badges focused on science, technology, engineering and math. It's the largest addition of new badges in a decade for Girl Scouts of the ...


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Pressure mounts to curtail surgery on intersex childrenNEW YORK (AP) — Children whose sexual characteristics don't neatly align with the norm have for decades faced surgery to rearrange their anatomy to resemble that of more typical boys and girls — long before they were old enough to have a say in the decision.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Anybody who did high school debate knows it's the worst way to tackle climate changeAnybody who spent time in the low-stakes-but-ego-ridden world of high school debate knows: Debate is a terrible way to address a topic with any semblance of subtlety.  That goes double for any topic related to science.  Climate change, then, would make for a particularly terrible topic for an open debate. It's no coincidence then that Scott Pruitt, administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and an avowed climate denier, has been pushing for a "red team/blue team" debate around the science of climate change. Pruitt does a good job of making the idea sound reasonable enough. "There are lots of questions that have not been asked and answered," Pruitt said. "Who better to do that than a group of scientists ... getting together and having a robust discussion for all the world to see." SEE ALSO: The 'debate' Rick Perry wants to hold on global warming is total BS A red team/blue team is a particular style of debate in which one side (red) challenges a consensus. The other side (blue) defends it.  Groups of scientists, particularly climate scientists, do this constantly. They hash out findings by publishing studies in peer-reviewed journals and at major conferences. They just don't do it in a debate format — and for good reason. High school debaters know what debate is about, and it's not about facts or policy or rational thought. It's about people — error-prone, confirmation-seeking, causation/correlation-confusing, generally-not-that-sharp people.  It's a perfect format for climate deniers seeking to take their science-deficient case to the American public. That's why the debate has been roundly rejected by most any scientist worth their doctorate. Science and its methods exist to sift out human error. In debate, human error is just part of the fun. That's a lesson high school debaters know well. They exist in a world where people spend hours in libraries combing through source material for crucial pieces of information that can make or break entire cases.  It's high school sports for future lawyers. Also, you learn sweet pen tricks. One of the many skills high school debate taught me: how to twirl a pen. pic.twitter.com/jEjL4xlx5E — Emily Farris (@emayfarris) May 30, 2017 The problem with high school debate is the problem with debate in general — the judges. Debaters battle in front of judges that are usually just the parents of kids on that school's team—that is to say just the regular-ole public. Any decent high school debater quickly learns that to win is not to be right, it's to read the judge and figure out how to get their vote. Same will go for a "debate" about climate change. It's worth noting that this is not an indictment of high school debate itself. I still look back fondly on my time in debate, where I learned far more from my debate teacher and fellow debaters than I did in any other class. It was the first piece of education that taught me how to think critically.  It's also how I ended up wearing dress clothes on the weekends while riding in a school bus without air conditioning in Houston, Texas. We weren't sweating through our khakis to defend an ideology.  Quite the opposite. Debate tests the skills of the debaters involved, not the actual merit of whatever topic or argument is being discussed. That's why it's the perfect format for climate deniers seeking to sway the public to their side without all that pesky science getting in the way. Two suave climate deniers will wipe the floor with a couple of numbers-focused scientists — and people will feel smarter for having sided with the deniers. The public's overestimation of its own intelligence when it comes to complex topics speaks to the evil genius of a climate debate. A debate just seems like a good structure. It satisfies some notion that we are great judges that can understand complex topics and decide for ourselves. This is, of course, not the case. Humans tend to be easily swayed by any variety of elements that have nothing to do with the issues at hand when making judgements.  Yet a debate just seems so entirely reasonable. Debates are part of American history. If they were good enough for Abraham Lincoln and John F. Kennedy, they're good enough for some weather nerds ... right? Climate scientists now face a no-win scenario. Doing the debate makes climate deniers appear on equal footing with climate scientists, elevating them far beyond where they should be. Such is the search for "balance" in the Trump era, where all viewpoints are worth of hearing. By that logic, it's worth having a debate between flat earthers and round earthers. In a world where all sides are worth hearing, experts and consensus are drowned out.  The alternative isn't much better. Rejecting the debate comes off as having something to hide. If scientists refuse to participate, climate deniers get to claim victory by forfeit. And then Pruitt and the EPA might hold the debate anyway. If the debate does end up happening, just remember this one thing: Debate is about the people involved, not the topic at hand. Debate is not about finding facts, let alone making scientific discoveries. Debate is about selling—yourself, primarily.  WATCH: The best way to release stress? Break your computer.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

'chemoWave' app helps cancer patients collect medical infoCancer survivor Ric Grenell helped create a health app after chemo treatments


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Five comic-book superpowers that animals actually haveIn the superhero world, Matt Murdock, who was blinded by radioactive waste as a child, developed a superhuman ability to sense using sound waves and became the superhero Daredevil. This gives Daredevil a 360-degree field of “vision”, allowing him to precisely locate objects or people in all directions, an obvious advantage over normal vision. Bats, despite being nocturnal animals, cannot see in the dark.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Why Do Humans Speak So Many Languages?People don't speak one universal language, or even a handful. Instead, today our species collectively speaks over 7,000 distinct languages.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Moon Dust Bag Fetches Nearly $2 Million at AuctionThe collection bag was used by astronaut Neil Armstrong during the first manned mission to the moon in 1969.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

A British Doctor Is Selling Land on Mars for 10 Acres Per PennyIn case your neighborhood has priced you out ...


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Water on the Moon Is More Plentiful than Scientists Suspected, Study ShowsScientists have discovered evidence that suggests a significant amount of water is trapped beneath the surface of the moon, raising questions about its origins and potentially bolstering future attempts to explore the Earth’s satellite. A study of data from satellites has found that deposits of volcanic material distributed across the moon’s surface contain very high levels of water, compared with surrounding areas, according to new research published in Nature Geoscience.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Archaeologists Return to Legendary Birthplace of King ArthurArchaeologists are back at the legendary birthplace of King Arthur. Last summer, researchers discovered traces of early medieval life at Tintagel in Cornwall, on England's southwest coast, where the legendary British monarch was said to have been born. It was during this time that King Arthur is said to have fought the invading Saxons.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Cool the Planet? Geoengineering Is Easier Said Than DoneWith the world facing increased warming, melting ice caps, rising sea levels, intense weather events and other global disasters, scientists are exploring ways to re-engineer the planet to counter the effects of global warming. Earth's surface has warmed, on average over land and sea, 1.53 degreesFahrenheit (0.85 degrees Celsius) since 1880, according to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, an international organization created by the United Nations to evaluate the state of climate change science. In the most recent issue of the journal Science, published online Thursday (July 20), two researchers provided perspective on two geoengineering methods that could reduce the so-called greenhouse effect, under which gases and clouds in Earth's atmosphere trap the sun's heat.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

This app will analyze your DNA to help you lose weightAnalyzing genetics could have clues to how your body processes food and reacts to exercise.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Did Oxygen Therapy Really 'Reverse' Child's Brain Damage? Experts Are SkepticalTwo doctors claim to have used controversial oxygen treatments to reverse brain damage in a 2-year-old from Arkansas who nearly died by drowning in a cold swimming pool, but other experts are very skeptical of the claims the doctors made in their report of the case. "I found the publication to be sufficiently suspect," said Dr. Ian Miller, a pediatric neurologist and medical director of the comprehensive epilepsy program at Nicklaus Children's Hospital in Miami, who was not involved in the report. "I really worry that other people who read about this on the internet will think that this is a legitimate type of therapy" for people with brain damage, when there is no proof of this, Miller told Live Science.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Endurance Identifies Four Chargeability Anomalies On The Elephant Property, AlaskaAll Four gold targets prioritized for drilling VANCOUVER, BC / ACCESSWIRE / July 24, 2017 / Endurance Gold Corporation (TSX.V: EDG) ("Endurance") is pleased to report the results of the induced ...


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Want a piece of scientific history? The former home of Joseph Priestley, who discovered oxygen, is on the marketA house that forms a vital piece of scientific history is on the market. It is the former home of Joseph Priestley, the scientist and radical thinker who discovered oxygen while working as a librarian for the Earl of Shelburne. Priestley lived at the property in the 1770s, after writing treatises on Unitarianism and a book about electricity – and inventing soda water. Priestley discovered oxygen in 1774 He made the discovery in 1774 in a lab built specially for him by the Earl on his country pile Bowood House, in Calne, Wiltshire. The famous experiment created oxygen by heating up mercuric oxide, before testing it on a mouse and then himself. He described the then unknown substance as being “five or six times better than common air for the purpose of respiration”. Priestley House was on the Earl’s land, but now sits in the charming village near some of the best schools in the area. The family home, named after the polymath, is arranged over four floors and has been carefully renovated, keeping period features such as exposed beams and sash windows. The property has a large walled garden, a sun terrace and a lawned area with a hot tub It has seven bedrooms and four reception rooms, each with big proportions and homely details such as an Aga and a totally handmade kitchen. The basement has rooms that offer opportunities for a studio or a snug. Outside, there is a large walled garden, a sun terrace, a lawned area complete with hot tub, and beyond there are many mature specimen trees, all overlooked by a conservatory. The house comes with seven bedrooms and four reception rooms The property is on the market for £1.25 million with Carter Jonas (01672 484107; carterjonas.co.uk).


07/24/2017   Wired Science
$80 and a spit sample gets you a spot on one of Helix’s sequencing machines and a chunk of its cloud storage for your exome sequence.
07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

South Africa moves ahead on domestic trade in rhino hornJOHANNESBURG (AP) — South Africa said Monday it is moving ahead with draft regulations for a domestic trade in rhino horn, despite critics' concerns that a legal market will spur rhino poaching.


07/24/2017   Wired Science
Traumatic injury in space has a huge potential impact on a mission. And people barely know anything about how to deal with it.
07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

NASA Has a Way to Cut Your Flight Time in HalfThe space agency’s supersonic plane design could be quiet enough to lift the long-standing ban on overland travel, if it makes it to production.


07/24/2017   Yahoo! Science

Booze in space: how the universe is absolutely drowning in the hard stuffIt's like one great big distillery up there.


07/23/2017   Yahoo! Science

Neil deGrasse Tyson Talks Joining Forces With George R.R. Martin on a Space Video Game‘Space Odyssey’ allows users to explore space and colonize planets. The astrophysicist discusses the new game, the controversial Space Corps, and why he’s ‘fearless’ of A.I.


07/23/2017   Yahoo! Science

Britain Is Launching a Major Initiative to Boost Battery TechnologyBritain Is Launching a Major Initiative to Boost Battery Technology


07/23/2017   Wired Science
Humanity might have saved itself a lot of trouble in the long run by investing in the Einstein-Szilard approach to cooling water with fire.
07/23/2017   Wired Science
Mathematical insights into how RNA helps viruses pull together their protein shells could guide future studies of viral behavior and function.
07/22/2017   Wired Science
SpaceX is rebooting its colonization plan, and may pivot to focus on a moon base that would aid that effort.
07/21/2017   Wired Science
Robert Johnson thinks that a proton-based image, even a blurry one, can guide a cancer treatment known as proton therapy better than a conventional X-ray.
07/21/2017   Wired Science
When a total solar eclipse passes over the US on August 21, nerds will flock to the areas where they can see a total blackout. How many of them can fit?
07/21/2017   Wired Science
Kate Russo is the world's go-to guide for communities planning for the massive influx of eclipse tourists this August 21.
07/20/2017   Wired Science
World leaders should plan before they go meddling with the atmosphere.
07/20/2017   Wired Science
Tuna owe their agility to a newfound hydraulic system that allows them to raise and lower some specialized fins.
07/20/2017   Wired Science
The Human Support Robot makes its way into the real world, giving a paralyzed veteran extra independence.
07/20/2017   Wired Science
The giant floating laboratory is in the middle of a bit of a mid-life crisis.
07/19/2017   Wired Science
Memories begin when your neurons respond to outside stimuli—and compound to rewire your brain.
07/19/2017   Wired Science
Researchers believe the ballooning stem cell clinic industry is taking advantage of the federal repository's honor system. And patients will be the ones to pay, literally.
07/19/2017   Wired Science
Last week, HHS abruptly canceled two years and $213 million worth of grants meant to aid teen pregnancy prevention, stunning public health researchers around the country.
07/18/2017   Wired Science
You can blame climate change for all those wildfires, but don't forget another factor: We love to build on the edge of wildlands.
07/17/2017   Wired Science
A controversial study of the electric grid, requested by Energy Secretary Rick Perry in April, is finally expected to be released this month.
07/17/2017   Wired Science
The Structural Genomics Consortium encourages pharma companies and academics to put all their cards on the table in the interest of speeding up drug research.
07/17/2017   Wired Science
Last week, military officials described how climate change would escalate instability across the globe and make it harder for the US military to conduct its operations.
07/17/2017   Wired Science
Last Thursday, a bunch of space capitalists met with a bunch of senators to talk policy.

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