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04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Norwegian Air has solid bookings, high demand, decreased costs, and increasing revenue. Despite those promising figures, the budget airline probably won’t make any money this year due to one thing: the grounding of the Boeing 737 Max 8. advertisement In an earnings release today, the airline’s CEO, Bjørn Kjos, said that he is...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
600 scientists are calling on the EU to make sustainability the cornerstone of its trade...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Widely dubbed as his "suicide note," the final message that Adolf Hitler ever wrote has surfaced and is set to go up for auction later this month. ......
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Extreme ocean winds and waves have become more common over the past three decades, according to scientists who warn climate change could be causing the trend. A team of experts at the University of Melborne looked at around 4 billion observations of wind speed and wave height captured by 31 satellites between 1985 and 2018. Overall, the study published in the journal Science indicated oceans appear to have become stormier. This has implications for coastal communities, as storm waves can erode beaches and cause flooding....
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
The world’s oceans have become more stormy during the past three decades, according to the largest and most detailed study of its kind. The findings add to concerns that as the world gets hotter, extreme events such as storms and floods could become more frequent and more devastating in their...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
If only the Daily Express was right. That is not a sentence I ever expected to type. “Extinction Rebellion protests have WORKED as MPs succumb to calls for change”, bellowed the rightwing rag. Alas, the government has not capitulated to demands to declare a climate emergency, let alone to...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Canada Council for the Arts recognized academics for outstanding contributions to the humanities, social sciences, natural sciences, health sciences and engineering. ......
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
An archaeologist analyzing a pile of prehistoric human poop found the remains of an entire viper, including a fang. Researcher Elanor Sonderman was studying the indigenous people who, 1500 years ago,...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
A recent study has delved into the spread of fake news on Facebook during the final six months of the 2016 presidential election campaign, and it seems only a small percentage of people shared links to false articles. Around 1,300 people used an app that allowed researchers to track links to external sites posted on their timelines. These were then compared to a database of “fake news”...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Kissing bugs can carry the parasite that causes Chagas disease, and they are now making their way through the US. Meet the kissing bug; the contrary insect with a charming moniker and deadly habits. While its name may bring to mind ladybugs or other cute critters, the kissing bug is actually a nocturnal bloodsucker that comes with an...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
UNT Health Science Center has appointed a new dean to the UNT System College of Pharmacy. Suresh Madhavan will take on his new role in Fort Worth after 31 years of working as an educator in West Virginia University. “There are so many...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Facebook Inc broke Canadian privacy laws when it collected the information of some 600,000 citizens, a top watchdog said on Thursday, pledging to seek a court order to force the social media giant to change its practices. Privacy Commissioner Daniel Therrien made his comments while releasing the results of an investigation, opened a year ago, into a data sharing scandal involving Facebook and the...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Reuters Shares A woman packs a box of vaccines to be delivered by a...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Zoo Miami is celebrating the birth of its newest addition: a rare baby rhino. The newborn is making history by being the first successful birth of the species as a result of induced ovulation and artificial insemination, according to the zoo. The rhino, whose gender is unknown, was born Tuesday at 12:30 a.m. and is the first baby for Akuti, a 7-year-old greater one-horned...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Nearly simultaneously, two players grab for a ball. Who got it first? Whether on the playground or sports arena, we think it’s ours, and scientists now know why: We mentally register our own sensations before whatever else is around us. “We have identified what may be a principal cause of arguments in ballgames, and it is about time,” conclude psychologists Ty Tang and Michael McBeath of Arizona State University. Their research is published in Wednesday’s issue of the journal...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
A UM-led team prepares to launch a research balloon during the Aug. 21, 2017, solar eclipse in Wyoming. M ISSOULA - The Montana Space Grant Consortium has received funding from MathWorks Inc. and the NASA Science Mission Directorate to perform weather measurements during the coming July 2 solar eclipse that will be visible in parts of Chile and Argentina. The University of Montana's Balloon Outreach, Research, Exploration and Landscape Imaging System (BOREALIS) program will lead a team of Montana researchers traveling...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
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04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
Vein scans and eye checks were on the schedule today as the Expedition 59 crew continues ongoing biomedical studies. The International Space Station is also getting ready to host a sixth spacecraft when it arrives next week. Scientists have been observing the space residents all week as they seek to...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
McGill University astrophysicist Matt Dobbs is the recipient of the 2019 Killam Research Fellowship in Natural Sciences. The announcement was made today by the Canada Council for the Arts, which revealed this year's winners of the prestigious Killam Program, composed of the Killam Prizes and the Killam Research Fellowships. Dobbs, a professor in McGill's Department of Physics and associate member of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, was rewarded for his project, Unveiling the Cosmos with a New Paradigm Digital Radio Telescope, involving the revolutionary CHIME radio telescope inaugurated in British Columbia in 2017. CHIME, the first major research telescope to be built...
04/25/2019   WorldNews Science
On April 10, 2019, the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) unveiled the first-ever image of a black hole's event horizon, the area beyond which light cannot escape the immense gravity of the black hole. That giant black hole, with a mass of 6.5 billion Suns, is located in the elliptical galaxy Messier 87 (M87). EHT is an international collaboration whose support in the U.S. includes the National Science Foundation. This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the entire M87 galaxy in infrared light. The EHT image, by contrast, relied on light in radio wavelengths and showed the black hole's shadow against the backdrop of high-energy material...
04/25/2019   Wired Science
The most radical talk at TED 2019 wasn't about a miracle cure or a moonshot. It was about a balloon that popped.
04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Brent touches $75 per barrel after Europe halts Russian crude importsBrent crude hit $75 per barrel on Thursday for the first time in nearly six months after quality concerns suspended some Russian crude exports to Europe while the United States prepared to tighten sanctions on Iran. Poland and Germany suspended imports of Russian crude via the Druzhba pipeline, citing contamination. Russia, the world's second-largest crude exporter, said it planned to start pumping clean fuel to Europe through the pipeline on April 29.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Why Aren't There More Habitable Planets? Blame Red DwarfsEven if a planet is in the habitable zone, a young star can wreak havoc on its atmosphere.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Apple Analysts Grow Reluctantly More Bullish Ahead of EarningsAt least four firms have raised their price targets on the stock over the past two days, but in each case, the call was tempered with caution, particularly over iPhone sales. Wolfe Research lifted its target by $10 to $185 on Thursday but said it “wouldn’t chase” the shares, which it described as overbought. “The iPhone faces headwinds, China relations still could blow up, we don’t see major new hardware in the next 12 months, and the stock’s discount to the market has closed,” analyst Steven Milunovich wrote in a note to clients.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

SpaceX escape engines were test fired before mishap: panelNASA's Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP) told reporters Elon Musk's rocket company continues to investigate the cause of the 'anomaly' during a test of engines designed to propel the crew to safety at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. Orange smoke was seen rising above SpaceX's facilities by a photographer working for local newspaper Florida Today. The capsule, which conducted a six-day test flight to the International Space Station in March, was one of at least six models SpaceX has in production.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

SpaceX, NASA tight-lipped on cause of crew capsule incidentNASA and SpaceX remained tight-lipped Thursday about what caused a mysterious but apparently serious incident last weekend during engine tests on the Crew Dragon capsule designed to carry US astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) later this year. SpaceX said that an "anomaly" had occurred during Saturday's ground tests at Cape Canaveral in Florida. The video has not been authenticated, nor has SpaceX denied its veracity.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

CDC Confirms Deadly ‘Kissing Bugs’ Have Arrived in The Northeast For The First TimeCute name, not so cute consequences.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Skipping Breakfast Is Linked To A Higher Risk Of Heart Disease, New Study RevealsBring on the pancakes!


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Death toll in South Africa floods and mudslides rises over 70KwaZulu-Natal province, where most of the deaths occurred after the downpours led to flooding and mudslides, has heavy rain every year, but they rarely kill so many people in such a short space of time. Some of the worst-hit areas were informal settlements in KwaZulu-Natal, where people live in flimsy houses without proper foundations or drainage systems. Sixty-seven people had died in KwaZulu-Natal, and six more in neighboring Eastern Cape province, authorities said.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

'Catastrophic breeding failure': Second largest emperor penguin colony 'all but disappeared'Antarctic's Halley Bay colony of emperor penguins has seen a "catastrophic breeding failure" over the past three years linked to melting sea ice.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

In degrading Nature humanity harms itself, UN report warnsDiplomats and scientists from 130 nations gather in Paris next week to vet and validate the first UN global assessment of the state of Nature in more than a decade, and the news is not good. A quarter of 100,000 species already assessed are on a path to extinction, and the total number facing a forced exit from the world stage is closer to a million, according to an executive summary, obtained by AFP, of a 1,800-page scientific report three years in the making. A score of 10-year targets adopted in 2010 under the UN's biodiversity treaty -- to expand protected areas, slow species and forest loss, and reduce pollution impact -- will almost all fail, the draft Summary for Policy Makers reports.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

This is our first look at the hole Japan blasted into an asteroidEarlier this month, Japan's space agency JAXA launched an explosive projectile at the space rock known as Ryugu from its Hayabusa2 asteroid probe. Japan wanted to blow a crater into the surface of the rock in order to collect some samples of the material lying underneath, and early observations suggested it nailed its mark as planned. Now we can finally see exactly what the crater looks like.To blow a hole in an asteroid without destroying the spacecraft itself -- and without the force of the shot pushing Hayabusa2 back out into space -- JAXA equipped the probe with explosive cannon-like charges that it releases into space above the asteroid's surface. The probe them retreats to a safe distance, the single-shot explosive charge fires its bullet-like projectile at the surface, and the probe returns to the site later.The deployment and firing of the projectile took place in early April, and now that the dust and debris has settled, Hayabusa2 has returned to the location and observed the crater it created.As you can see in the GIF above, the projectile struck Ryugu as intended, pushing some of the larger rocks away and displacing much of the pale white dust that covered the surface. What's left behind is a dark area of "fresh" asteroid material, which is exactly what JAXA was hoping for.JAXA scientists were initially skeptical that the projectile could create a hole of a reasonable size. Some more pessimistic estimates suggested the crater might be as small as three meters across. This crater is significantly larger, and Hayabusa2's engineers noted that they were pleasantly surprised with the results.It's a huge success for Hayabusa2, but the probe's job isn't done yet. JAXA ultimately wants to retrieve a sample of this fresh material before it commands Hayabusa2 to return to Earth, but the safety of the spacecraft is paramount and it's unclear if or when such a maneuver would happen. The spacecraft is expected to spend much of the rest of the year in orbit around the asteroid, so JAXA will have plenty of time to decide how to proceed.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Here we go again: Earth's major 'mass extinctions'Paris (AFP) - Most scientists agree that a "mass extinction" event is underway on Earth, with species disappearing hundreds of time quicker under the influence of human activity.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Better, Safer Sex: On the Hunt for a Condom People Will Actually LikeAs STD rates rise, researchers are looking to reinvent the most reliable disease-preventing contraception


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

UK regulator blocks Sainsbury's $9.4 billion takeover of Walmart's ASDALONDON/BENTONVILLE, Ark. (Reuters) - Britain's competition regulator on Thursday blocked Sainsbury's proposed 7.3 billion pound ($9.4 billion) takeover of Walmart-owned Asda - a huge blow to the supermarket groups who wanted to combine to overtake market leader Tesco. The Competition and Markets Authority (CMA) ruling is also a major setback for Sainsbury's Chief Executive Mike Coupe, the architect of the deal and the group's boss since 2014. For Walmart , the deal was a way to exit Britain, one of the weakest performers in its global portfolio, as it moves to revamp its international operations.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Bond 25: Everything We Know About the New James Bond MovieThe details of 007's next big adventure are finally dropping.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

‘Peanuts In Space’ From Morgan Neville & Imagine OK’d For Launch On Apple TVMorgan Neville, Imagine Documentaries, and Peanuts have teamed for Peanuts in Space: Secrets of Apollo 10, a documentary of sorts that seeks to answer the question: Was Snoopy a world famous, top-secret astronaut? It will launch in May will be available in May on the Apple TV app. Aaron Bergeron wrote the script. Imagine's Ron […]


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Continental Building Products Announces Susan G. Komen® PartnershipHERNDON, Va.-(BUSINESS WIRE)-Since 1982, Susan G. Komen has worked toward one vision: to create a world without breast cancer. Continental Building Products announced today that it stands by this vision and will support Susan G. Komen and its mission to save lives by meeting the most critical needs in our communities and investing in breakthrough […]


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Gilead experimental NASH drug fails another studyCalifornia-based Gilead has been counting on its drug pipeline, including the NASH drug selonsertib, as sales of its hepatitis C treatments fall due to a smaller patient pool and intensifying competition, denting profits. Oppenheimer & Co analyst Hartaj Singh said the expectation were low after the drug failed another late-stage study in February. Successful treatments for non-alcoholic steatohepatitis have remained elusive, and Gilead stopped developing another treatment for the disease in 2016.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

Scientists Just Mapped a Quarter of the World's Coral and Boy Is It in Bad ShapeThe atlas will make it easier to study the conditions of the threatened environments from afar.


04/25/2019   Yahoo! Science

7 top products to fight springtime allergiesThe flowers have bloomed and the pollen is out


04/24/2019   Wired Science
A new brain-computer interface takes the snap, crackle, pop from inside your motor cortex and translates it into digitally synthesized speech.
04/24/2019   Wired Science
In the year since the arrest of the Golden State Killer, investigative genetic genealogy has emerged as the most powerful crime-fighting tool since DNA itself.
04/23/2019   Wired Science
During engine tests of SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft this past Saturday, the vehicle experienced what the company has characterized as an "anomaly."
04/23/2019   Wired Science
It's easier to follow rules when you know why they exist. In this case, you can calculate the force of an object hitting a melon to see why hard hats matter.
04/23/2019   Wired Science
Opinion: Robots seem to be the solution to the last-mile problem. But mechanization will likely come for a different part of the process first.
04/22/2019   Wired Science
MIT's Erik Brynjolfsson on why the Westworld dystopia is (hopefully) far off and why you should never use a telepresence robot to tell someone they’re dying.
04/21/2019   Wired Science
A decades-long fire in Pennsylvania revealed some unexpected twists in how microbes survive in harsh environments.
04/21/2019   Wired Science
Opinion: Researchers are studying how artificial intelligence could predict risks of premature death. But the health care industry needs to consider another risk: unconscious bias in AI.
04/19/2019   Wired Science
A slavery-themed ad for Ancestry.com exposes the awkward relationship between America's darkest history and the current boom in family-tree building.
04/19/2019   Wired Science
Mac and cheese. Peanut butter and jelly. Asparagus and … cannabis oil with a citrusy terpene profile? Welcome to the heady world of cannabis cuisine.
04/19/2019   Wired Science
At TED 2019, neuroscientist Matthew Walker argued that sleep deprivation is having a catastrophic effect on our health and safety—here are all the ways.
04/18/2019   Wired Science
The city's new rules compel the owners of big buildings to dramatically reduce their carbon emissions as part of a broad package of climate reforms.
04/18/2019   Wired Science
Part scientific instrument and part vacation destination, China's FAST radio telescope welcomed visitors with their radio wave-emitting gadgets—until it didn't.
04/18/2019   Wired Science
An emerging fault system along the Nevada border is shaking up the tech industry’s latest frontier—and only a small group of scientists is paying attention.
04/17/2019   Wired Science
In a new video, a team of robo-puppers pulls a truck as if it were a sled. Here's how to estimate these SpotMinis' pulling force and the friction involved.
04/17/2019   Wired Science
When an unborn baby is diagnosed with a life-threatening defect, it can be devastating. So some scientists hope to treat the fetus in the uterus using gene editing.
04/17/2019   Wired Science
Bigger turbines, taller towers, and longer cables are making offshore wind farms more attractive than ever before.
04/16/2019   Wired Science
The trailer for *Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker* didn't disappoint: The universe's physics remain as quirky as ever.
04/16/2019   Wired Science
The state legislature used a method that's designed to capture the intensity of a voter's preference as a way to fix some of traditional voting's big problems.

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