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11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
RESTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The U.S. Army selected Science Applications International Corp. (NYSE: SAIC) to modernize its information technology (IT) infrastructure by migrating enterprise applications to a cloud environment. The Army Human Resources Command Cloud Computing Environment (HRC2E) contract is worth more than $41 million over three years and was competed under the Information Technology Enterprise Solutions - 3 Services (ITES-3S) contract. 'We are excited and pleased to work with the Army/HRC to modernize their legacy systems and help steward their applications to a cloud environment. This initiative is a critical step towards the Army's goal to capitalize on cost savings,...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Veteran biopharmaceutical executive with broad experience at global companies brings more than 25 years of finance, partnering and M&A experience to role WATERTOWN, Mass., Nov. 14, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- EyePoint Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (NASDAQ:EYPT), a specialty biopharmaceutical company committed to developing and commercializing innovative ophthalmic products, today announced the appointment of George O. Elston as Chief Financial Officer and Head of Corporate Development. Mr. Elston has previously been a consultant to the Company and will now transition into this permanent role effective immediately. In this role, Mr. Elston will lead the Company's financial, capital markets, and...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Berlin, Germany, and Boston, USA, November 14, 2019 - Bayer and Dewpoint Therapeutics, a biotechnology company with sites in Boston and Dresden, Germany, today announced an option, research and license agreement worth up to USD 100 million. The partnership will leverage Dewpoint's proprietary platform for biomolecular condensates and Bayer's small molecule compound library to develop new treatments for cardiovascular and gynecological diseases. Today, around 80 percent of the human proteome is still considered to be beyond the reach of small molecules, which make up more than 80 percent of all marketed therapeutic drugs. The emerging paradigm of biomolecular condensates is expanding the...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, Calif., Nov. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- VistaGen Therapeutics (NASDAQ: VTGN), a clinical-stage biopharmaceutical company developing new generation medicines for central nervous system (CNS) diseases and disorders with high unmet need, today announced topline results from the ELEVATE study, a Phase 2 study of AV-101, its NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptor glycine site antagonist, as an adjunctive treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). In this study, the AV-101 treatment arm did not differentiate from placebo on the primary endpoint (change in the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS-10) total score compared to baseline). As in prior clinical studies,...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Nov 14, 2019 Download this Press Release PDF Format (opens in new window) () New FX TCA benchmarks leverage Virtu's multi-asset market making technology and experience NEW YORK, Nov. 14, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Virtu Financial, Inc. (NASDAQ: VIRT) a leading provider of financial services and products that leverages cutting edge technology to deliver liquidity to the global markets and provide execution services and data, analytics and connectivity products, announced today that it is...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
GUELPH, Ontario and NAJU, South Korea, Nov. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Canadian Solar Inc. (the 'Company', or 'Canadian Solar') (NASDAQ: CSIQ), one of the world's largest solar power companies, today announced that it has sold 49% interest in three solar photovoltaic projects in Mexico totaling 370 MWp (294 MWac) to Korea Electric Power Corporation ('KEPCO'), South Korea's largest electric utility, and Sprott Korea, a leading fund manager ('Sprott'). KEPCO and Sprott acquired the interests in the Horus (119MWp), Tastiota (125MWp) and El Mayo (126 MWp) projects located in the states of Aguascalientes and Sonora. Under the agreement, KEPCO and Sprott will acquire Canadian Solar's remaining...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Texas A&M University to Establish Trimble Technology Lab for Geosciences November 14, 2019 SUNNYVALE, Calif. and COLLEGE STATION, Texas, Nov. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Texas A&M University has received a gift from Trimble (NASDAQ: TRMB) to establish a state-of-the-art Trimble Technology Lab in the College of Geosciences. The Lab will provide an integrated field and classroom experience that will empower geospatial education at the University. Using Trimble hardware and software, the Technology Lab will incorporate field-based data collection, modeling and analysis capabilities that will provide students hands-on experience with solutions that they can use in future internships and...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
IDT's RapidWave portfolio enables operators and OEMs to design affordable 5G CPE gateways in compact form factors. SAN JOSE, Calif., November 14, 2019 - Integrated Device Technology, Inc. (IDT), a wholly owned subsidiary of Renesas Electronics Corporation (TSE: 6723), today announced its newest RapidWave product, the RWM6051, a millimeter wave (mmWave) modem for customer premise equipment (CPE) targeted for 5G fixed wireless networks. The RWM6051 comprehensive features deliver wireless broadband service providers an ultra-wideband spectrum of 14 GHz V-band from 57 to 71 GHz to simplify and accelerate network deployments. The RapidWave products operate in the unlicensed spectrum, permitting...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
SECURITIES & EXCHANGE COMMISSION EDGAR FILING GLOWPOINT, INC. Form: PRE 14A Date Filed: 2019-11-14 Corporate Issuer CIK: 746210 © Copyright 2019, Issuer Direct Corporation. All Right Reserved. Distribution of this document is strictly prohibited, subject to the terms of use. UNITED STATES SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Washington, D.C. 20549 SCHEDULE 14A Proxy Statement Pursuant to Section 14(a) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (Amendment No. ) Filed by the Registrant [X] Filed by a party other than the Registrant [ ] Check the appropriate box: [X] Preliminary Proxy Statement ] Confidential, for Use of the Commission Only (as permitted by Rule 14a-6(e)(2)) ] Definitive Proxy...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
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11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
HOUSTON, Nov. 14, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Houston Wire & Cable Company (Nasdaq: HWCC) today announced that James L. Pokluda, President & CEO, will be presenting at the Southwest IDEAS 2019 Conference on Thursday, November 21st at 3:35 p.m. Central Time at the Westin Dallas Downtown in Dallas, TX. An audio webcast of this presentation will be...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
SAN DIEGO, Nov.14, 2019 /PRNewswire / -- Trovagene, Inc. (Nasdaq: TROV), a clinical-stage, Precision Cancer Medicine™ oncology therapeutics company developing drugs that target cell division (mitosis), for the treatment of various cancers including prostate, colorectal and leukemia, today announced new positive data from its Phase 2 trial evaluating onvansertib in combination with Zytiga® (abiraterone acetate - Johnson & Johnson)/prednisone in patients with metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (mCRPC). The data are being presented today at the European Multidisciplinary Congress on Urological Cancers (EMUC) in Vienna, Austria. 'The new data shared today builds upon the encouraging...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
ORLANDO, FL / ACCESSWIRE / November 14, 2019 /LightPath Technologies, Inc. (NASDAQ:LPTH) ('LightPath,' the 'Company,' or 'we'), a leading vertically integrated global manufacturer, distributor and integrator of proprietary optical and infrared components and high-level assemblies, today announced it has been awarded a renewal of an annual supply agreement valued at $5.0 million. The contract is for the purchase of a variety of infrared ('IR') optical lens elements by a major commercial infrared vision products customer. The agreement includes an option to increase the contract to $6.0 million upon the acceptance of new designed chalcogenide lenses within 6 months from the date of the...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
A new treatment for lung disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) for which there remains no cure could potentially benefit all patients, according to a University of Bristol study published in Chemical Science. The findings are an important step towards a new therapy addressing the fundamental cause of cystic fibrosis. Cystic Fibrosis is a debilitating disease that leads to a build-up of sticky mucus in several organs of the body, including the lungs and intestine. It is caused by a defective gene and affects between 70,000 and...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
SAN FRANCISCO, CA / ACCESSWIRE / November 14, 2019 / Jaguar Health, Inc. (NASDAQ:JAGX) ('Jaguar' or the 'Company'), today announced that Georgetown University's Data Safety Monitoring Committee ('DSMC') has reviewed the interim analysis for futility for the third-party, investigator-initiated Phase 2 HALT-D study evaluating the effectiveness of Mytesi® (crofelemer) for symptomatic relief in HER2 positive breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy with trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and docetaxel or paclitaxel or trastuzumab, pertuzumab, carboplatin, and docetaxel (the 'Study'). The DSMC has notified the Principal Investigator that the Study is allowed to enroll to completion. Enrollment in the...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
BRENTWOOD, Tenn. Nov. 13, 2019 - The U.S. Department of Labor has given Brookdale Senior Living approval to create a new certified nursing assistant (CNA) apprenticeship program. The program will provide Brookdale associates with on-the-job and technical training to advance their careers, and help address a projected nationwide shortage of healthcare workers and professional caregivers. Brookdale plans to pilot the program at communities in Chattanooga, Tenn., early next year, and will consider expanding...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Axon CFO Jawad Ahsan to speak at premier CFO conference on November 21 SCOTTSDALE, Ariz., Nov. 14, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- Axon Enterprise, Inc. (Nasdaq: AAXN), the global leader in connected public safety technologies, today announced that Jawad Ahsan, Axon Chief Financial Officer (CFO), will be a featured speaker at the 17th annual MIT Sloan CFO Summit, the nation's premier one-day CFO conference. This year's conference, titled 'The Durable CFO: Results and Reinvention,' explores the role of CFOs in guiding today's results as well as reinventing tomorrow's strategy and operations with...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
Trimble's BIM Software Enables MEP Professionals to Streamline the Production of Constructible Models Trimble Nova 15.1 Includes Access to Trimble's Cloud-Based Content Platform Enabling MEP Engineers and Manufacturers to Improve Collaboration SUNNYVALE, Calif, Nov. 14, 2019-Trimble (NASDAQ: TRMB) announced today Trimble Nova version 15.1 Mechanical, Electrical and Plumbing (MEP) design software. In the new version, 3D manufacturer-specific components can be directly downloaded and placed into a model from the cloud-based content platform. Nova users now have easy access to up-to-date manufacturer content in real time. As a result, manufacturers are better able to...
11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
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11/14/2019   WorldNews Science
November 14, 2019 Print This Page Vancouver, BC - Cypress Development Corp. (TSX-V: CYP) (OTCQB: CYDVF) (Frankfurt: C1Z1) ('Cypress' or 'the Company') is pleased to report the Company has contracted NORAM Engineering and Constructors Ltd. of Vancouver, BC ('NORAM') to conduct concept testing for the Company's Clayton Valley Lithium Project in Nevada. The test work will focus on the downstream portion of the revised extraction flowsheet and run in parallel with completion of the prefeasibility study ('PFS') of the project. The work will be conducted at BC Research Inc., a member of the NORAM Group of companies, located in Richmond, British Columbia. Cypress released positive results from the...
11/14/2019   Yahoo! Science

Researchers put out the call for 10,000 canines to join the Dog Aging ProjectScientists are looking for 10,000 good dogs to take part in a 10-year effort aimed at tracking their health and identifying factors that can lengthen their lifespan. The pets that are selected for the Dog Aging Project could come in for some scientific pampering, including genome sequencing and health assessments. But that doesn't mean the project's organizers at the University of Washington, Texas A&M University and other research institutions are totally going to the dogs. The larger purpose of the campaign — and the reason why it's getting $15 million in direct funding from the National Institute on Aging at… Read More


11/13/2019   Yahoo! Science

A troubling new study shows that legalizing marijuana is linked with an increase in problematic pot use among teensRecreational marijuana is legal in 11 states, and some Democratic presidential candidates have said the drug should become legal nationwide.


11/13/2019   Wired Science
A new report from over 100 experts paints a devastating picture of how climate change is already imperiling human health.
11/13/2019   Yahoo! Science

SpaceX executes ground-based test firing for Crew Dragon’s launch escape systemSpaceX went the distance today with a static-fire test of its Crew Dragon space taxi's launch escape system — the same type of test that ended in a costly explosion when it was conducted in April. A photo released after the firing shows the Crew Dragon's SuperDraco thrusters blazing away on the test stand at SpaceX's Florida facility. The full-duration firing brings the company one step closer to flying NASA astronauts to the International Space Station next year. "SpaceX and NASA teams are now reviewing test data and working toward an in-flight demonstration of Crew Dragon's launch escape system," SpaceX… Read More


11/13/2019   Wired Science
The federal agency plans to adopt a long-sought regulation that would let it ignore large swaths of environmental science in its rulemaking.
11/13/2019   Yahoo! Science

After visiting asteroid, Japan’s Hayabusa 2 probe heads back to Earth with samplesJapan's Hayabusa 2 spacecraft and its science team bid a bittersweet farewell to the asteroid Ryugu, 180 million miles from Earth, and began the months-long return trip to Earth with a precious set of samples. "This is an emotional moment!" the team tweeted on Tuesday. “It's sad to say goodbye to Ryugu,” project manager Yuichi Tsuda said at the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's command center. “Literally it has been at the center of our lives over the past one and a half years.” The farewell isn't finished quite yet, however. Over the next few days, Hayabusa 2's camera will capture… Read More


11/13/2019   Yahoo! Science

Red tide, the toxic algae bloom that kills wildlife, returns to southwest FloridaSouthwest Florida is warily watching the return of red tide, a toxic algae bloom that cost businesses nearly $150 million in losses last year


11/13/2019   Yahoo! Science

Hair-raising truth behind pigeons' lost toesNext time you visit your hairdresser spare a thought for the pigeons. For a long time scientists thought the fact that pigeons in urban environments often lost their toes was due to some form of infection, or was a reaction to chemical pollutants. The team from the National Museum of Natural History and the University of Lyon recorded the occurrence and extent of toe mutilations from pigeons eking out their time in 46 sites across Paris.


11/13/2019   Wired Science
Genius is a myth, the former *MythBusters* cohost believes. You get smarter by investing time and energy in something you love.
11/12/2019   Yahoo! Science

‘Ultima Thule’ no more: New Horizons’ space snowman is named ArrokothThe snowman-shaped object that NASA's New Horizons probe flew past nearly a year ago on the solar system's icy fringe now has a Native American name: Arrokoth, a word that means "sky" in the Powhatan/Algonquian language. Arrokoth replaces earlier labels for the Kuiper Belt object, including the numerical designation 2014 MU69 and the nickname Ultima Thule, which turned out to be rather controversial. Members of the New Horizons science team announced today that their proposed name has won approval by the International Astronomical Union and its Minor Planet Center. Before making the proposal, the scientists won the consent of elders… Read More


11/12/2019   Wired Science
The more scientists learn about the slumbering brain, the more they realize how vital sleep actually is. Now some researchers hope to develop it into a form of medicine.
11/12/2019   Wired Science
Don’t trust your eyes—the water’s not moving the way you think it is.
11/11/2019   Wired Science
Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.
11/11/2019   Wired Science
A veteran analyst explains the work of gathering fingerprints that can link a suspect to a crime—even after it rains.
11/11/2019   Yahoo! Science

Hurricanes on the scale of Katrina and Harvey are now 3 times more likely than a century ago: 'We cannot hope to combat storms'A new study reveals that extremely damaging hurricanes are becoming more frequent relative to moderate storms, likely due to climate change.


11/11/2019   Wired Science
Fish larvae off the coast of Hawaii are mistaking tiny pieces of plastic for prey, an alarming finding with big implications for the oceanic food web.
11/10/2019   Wired Science
And what Alphabet’s moonshot factory, X, is going after next.
11/10/2019   Wired Science
Neural networks are demonstrating profound leaps in their abilities when they're tasked with open exploration instead of a narrowly focused goal.
11/09/2019   Wired Science
The timing of the walrus's disappearance suggests the Vikings, and their ivory trade, had something to do with it. 
11/08/2019   Wired Science
The UC Berkeley professor talks about using algorithms to make it safer for robots and people to cross paths.
11/08/2019   Wired Science
can lab grown meat and plant-based meat alternatives fight climate change?
11/08/2019   Wired Science
At the WIRED25 festival in San Francisco, three *Juliana v. United States* plaintiffs talk about suing the government to force it to save us from climate doom.
11/08/2019   Yahoo! Science

Officials believe vitamin E oil is playing a pivotal role in the outbreak of vaping-related lung illnesses, after 39 deathsInvestigators said vitamin E acetate, an ingredient found in canola, soy, and corn oil, appears to be playing a pivotal role in the spate of vaping-related lung illnesses during a call with reporters on Friday.


11/08/2019   Yahoo! Science

When the Andromeda galaxy crashes into the Milky Way, this is what it could look like from EarthThe Milky Way is on track to collide with the Andromeda galaxy in about 4 billion years. NASA images reveal what the night sky might look like.


11/08/2019   Wired Science
Single-purpose quantum computers are helping physicists build simulations of nature's greatest hits and observe them up close.
11/07/2019   Wired Science
Catch up on the most important news from today in two minutes or less.
11/07/2019   Yahoo! Science

Boeing traces problem with Starliner parachute system to an unsecured pinFor want of a pin, the use of a spaceship's parachute was lost. That may be a simplistic way to explain why one of the three parachutes on Boeing's CST-100 Starliner space taxi failed to open. It does, however, serve as a cautionary tale about the one obvious glitch in Monday's pad abort test of the Starliner, a craft that's due to start transporting NASA astronauts to and from the International Space Station next year. Overall, the test was judged a success: The uncrewed Starliner fired the rocket engines on its launch abort system, slowed its descent with the aid… Read More


11/07/2019   Wired Science
Six years after it ceased to be an official diagnosis, Asperger's lives on as a unifying label and a source of strength.
11/07/2019   Yahoo! Science

Photos from space reveal what climate change looks like, from melting Arctic ice to rampant California firesExtreme weather events like hurricanes, droughts, and wildfires are linked to climate change. Such phenomena can be seen from space.


11/07/2019   Wired Science
Not quite an e-cigarette and not the old paper kind either, the Iqos is the latest controversial device to enter the vaping wars.
11/07/2019   Wired Science
A carbon-negative vodka company makes its beverage literally out of thin air. Now that's booze you can use.
11/06/2019   Yahoo! Science

NASA cracks open a sample of moon soil that’s been shut away for four decadesFor the first time in more than 40 years, NASA has opened up a pristine sample of moon dirt and rocks that was collected during the Apollo missions. Scientists hope that a close analysis of the material from a 2-foot-long, nearly 2-inch-wide core sample will help astronauts get ready for a new series of Artemis moon missions in the 2020s. When Apollo's moonwalkers collected samples of lunar soil and rock, also known as regolith, some of those samples were tucked away at NASA's Johnson Space Center with the expectation that analytical tools would improve over the course of the decades… Read More


11/06/2019   Wired Science
The state may emit much more of the greenhouse gas than expected. But a new survey has revealed the top offenders, making leaks easier to control.
11/06/2019   Yahoo! Science

2019’s Allen Distinguished Investigators will focus on the mysteries of our cellsThe Paul G. Allen Frontiers Group, a division of Seattle's Allen Institute, is making a total of $7.5 million in awards to its latest class of five biomedical researchers. The themes for this year's Allen Distinguished Investigators focus on stem cell therapies and single-cell interactions in their native environments. “The field of stem cell biology has the potential to change how we treat diseases by helping precision medicine, and there’s so much we still don’t understand about the interplay between cells in living tissues or organs,” Kathy Richmond, director of the Frontiers Group, said today in a news release. "Our… Read More


11/05/2019   Yahoo! Science

Spaceflight and Rocket Lab will put a Japanese shooting-star satellite into orbitSeattle-based Spaceflight says it's handling the pre-launch logistics for a Japanese satellite that's designed to spray artificial shooting stars into the sky. Tokyo-based ALE's spacecraft is just one of seven satellites due to be sent into orbit from New Zealand as early as Nov. 25, aboard a Rocket Lab Electron launch vehicle. It'll be the 10th Electron launch, earning the nickname "Running Out of Fingers." It'll also be the first launch to test the guidance and navigation hardware as well as the sensors that Rocket Lab will eventually use to help make the Electron's first stage recoverable. No recovery will… Read More


11/05/2019   Yahoo! Science

Boeing proposes lunar lander for NASA crews, rivaling Blue Origin (and SpaceX?)Boeing says it has submitted its proposal for a lunar lander capable of putting astronauts on the moon by as early as 2024, joining a competition that includes Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos' Blue Origin space venture and most likely SpaceX as well. Today marked the deadline for submissions. NASA says it's aiming to select at least two proposed landing systems by January for further development. Two separate teams could be selected to build landers for moon missions in 2024 and 2025. NASA envisions a system that includes a transfer vehicle to ferry a lander from a lunar-orbiting Gateway outpost to… Read More


11/05/2019   Yahoo! Science

Why Didn't She Get Alzheimer's? The Answer Could Hold a Key to Fighting the DiseaseThe woman's genetic profile showed she would develop Alzheimer's by the time she turned 50.A member of the world's largest family to suffer from Alzheimer's, she, like generations of her relatives, was born with a gene mutation that causes people to begin having memory and thinking problems in their 40s and deteriorate rapidly toward death around age 60.But remarkably, she experienced no cognitive decline at all until her 70s, nearly three decades later than expected.How did that happen? New research provides an answer, one that experts say could change the scientific understanding of Alzheimer's disease and inspire new ideas about how to prevent and treat it.In a study published Monday in the journal Nature Medicine, researchers say the woman, whose name they withheld to protect her privacy, has another mutation that has protected her from dementia even though her brain has developed a major neurological feature of Alzheimer's disease.This ultra rare mutation appears to help stave off the disease by minimizing the binding of a particular sugar compound to an important gene. That finding suggests that treatments could be developed to give other people that same protective mechanism."I'm very excited to see this new study come out -- the impact is dramatic," said Dr. Yadong Huang, a senior investigator at Gladstone Institutes, who was not involved in the research. "For both research and therapeutic development, this new finding is very important."A drug or gene therapy would not be available any time soon because scientists first need to replicate the protective mechanism found in this one patient by testing it in laboratory animals and human brain cells.Still, this case comes at a time when the Alzheimer's field is craving new approaches after billions of dollars have been spent on developing and testing treatments and some 200 drug trials have failed. It has been more than 15 years since the last treatment for dementia was approved, and the few drugs available do not work very well for very long.The woman is entering her late 70s now and lives in Medellin, the epicenter for an extended Colombian family of about 6,000 people whose members have been plagued with dementia for centuries, a condition they called "La Bobera" -- "the foolishness" -- and attributed to superstitious causes.Decades ago, a Colombian neurologist, Dr. Francisco Lopera, began painstakingly collecting the family's birth and death records in Medellin and remote Andes mountain villages. He documented the sprawling family tree and took dangerous risks in guerrilla and drug-trafficking territory to cajole relatives of people who died with dementia into giving him their brains for analysis.Through this work, Lopera, whose brain bank at the University of Antioquia now contains 300 brains, helped discover that their Alzheimer's was caused by a mutation on a gene called Presenilin 1.While this type of hereditary early-onset dementia accounts for only a small proportion of the roughly 30 million people worldwide with Alzheimer's, it is important because unlike most forms of Alzheimer's, the Colombian version has been traced to a specific cause and a consistent pattern. So Lopera and a team of American scientists have spent years studying the family, searching for answers both to help the Colombians and to address the mounting epidemic of the more typical old-age Alzheimer's disease.When they found that the woman had the Presenilin 1 mutation, but had not yet even developed a pre-Alzheimer's condition called mild cognitive impairment, the scientists were mystified."We have a single person who is resilient to Alzheimer's disease when she should be at high risk," said Dr. Eric Reiman, executive director of the Banner Alzheimer's Institute in Phoenix and a leader of the research team.The woman was flown to Boston, where some of the researchers are based, for brain scans and other tests. Those results were puzzling, said Yakeel Quiroz, a Colombian neuropsychologist who directs the familial dementia neuroimaging lab at Massachusetts General Hospital.The woman's brain was laden with the foremost hallmark of Alzheimer's: plaques of amyloid protein."The highest levels of amyloid that we have seen so far," said Quiroz, adding that the excessive amyloid probably accumulated because the woman has lived much longer than other family members with the Alzheimer's-causing mutation.But the woman had few other neurological signs of the disease -- not much of a protein called tau, which forms tangles in Alzheimer's brains, and little neurodegeneration or brain atrophy."Her brain was functioning really well," said Quiroz, who, like Reiman, is a senior author of the study. "Compared to people who are 45 or 50, she's actually better."She said the woman, who raised four children, had only one year of formal education and could barely read or write, so it was unlikely her cognitive protection came from educational stimulation."She has a secret in her biology," Lopera said. "This case is a big window to discover new approaches."Quiroz consulted Dr. Joseph Arboleda-Velasquez, who, like her, is an assistant professor at Harvard Medical School (he is also Quiroz's husband). Arboleda-Velasquez, a cell biologist at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, conducted extensive genetic testing and sequencing, determining that the woman has an extremely rare mutation on a gene called APOE.APOE is important in general-population Alzheimer's. One variant, APOE4, present in about 14% of people, greatly increases risk and is present in 40% of people with Alzheimer's. People with another variant, APOE2, occurring in about 7% of the population, are less likely to develop Alzheimer's, while those with the most common variant, APOE3, are in the middle.The Colombian woman has two copies of APOE3, but both copies have a mutation called Christchurch (for the New Zealand city where it was discovered). The Christchurch mutation is extremely rare, but several years ago, Reiman's daughter Rebecca, a technologist, helped determine that a handful of Colombian family members have that mutation on one of their APOE genes. They developed Alzheimer's as early as their relatives, though -- unlike the woman with mutations on both APOE genes."The fact that she had two copies, not just one, really kind of sealed the deal," Arboleda-Velasquez said.The woman's mutation is in an area of the APOE gene that binds with a sugar-protein compound called heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), which is involved in spreading tau in Alzheimer's disease.In laboratory experiments, the researchers found that the less a variant of APOE binds to HSPG, the less it is linked to Alzheimer's. With the Christchurch mutation, there was barely any binding.That, said Arboleda-Velasquez, "was the piece that completed the puzzle because, 'Oh, this is how the mutation has such a strong effect.'"Researchers were also able to develop a compound that, in laboratory dish experiments, mimicked the action of the mutation, suggesting it's possible to make drugs that prevent APOE from binding to HSPG.Dr. Guojun Bu, who studies APOE, said that while the findings involved a single case and more research is needed, the implications could be profound."When you have delayed onset of Alzheimer's by three decades, you say wow," said Bu, chairman of the neuroscience department at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, who was not involved in the study.He said the research suggests that instead of drugs attacking amyloid or tau, which have failed in many clinical trials, a medication or gene therapy targeting APOE could be promising.Reiman, who led another newly published study showing that APOE has a bigger impact on a person's risk of getting Alzheimer's than previously thought, said potential treatments could try to reduce or even silence APOE activity in the brain. People born without APOE appear to have no cognitive problems, but they do have very high cholesterol that requires treatment.Huang, who wrote a commentary about the study and is affiliated with two companies focusing on potential APOE-related treatments, said the findings also challenge a leading Alzheimer's theory about the role of amyloid.Since the woman had huge amounts of amyloid but few other Alzheimer's indicators, "it actually illustrates, to my knowledge for the first time, a very clear dissociation of amyloid accumulation from tau pathology, neurodegeneration and even cognitive decline," he said.Lopera said the woman is just beginning to develop dementia, and he recently disclosed her genetic profile to her four adult children, who each have only one copy of the Christchurch mutation.The researchers are also evaluating a few other members of the Colombian family, who appear to also have some resistance to Alzheimer's. They are not as old as the woman, and they do not have the Christchurch mutation, but the team hopes to find other genetic factors from studying them and examine whether those factors operate along the same or different biological pathways, Reiman said."We've learned that at least one individual can live for very long having the cause of Alzheimer's, and she's resistant to it," Arboleda-Velasquez said. "What this patient is teaching is there could be a pathway for correcting the disease."This article originally appeared in The New York Times.(C) 2019 The New York Times Company


11/04/2019   Yahoo! Science

NASA's Voyager 2 spacecraft beamed back unprecedented data from interstellar space. It indicates a mysterious extra layer outside our solar system.Voyager 2 sent data about the edge of the solar system back to Earth. NASA scientists say it presents a new puzzle about what's beyond the heliopause.


11/04/2019   Yahoo! Science

NASA is ‘thrilled’ with pad abort test for Boeing’s Starliner space taxi despite parachute glitchBoeing cleared a key milestone for launching NASA astronauts on its CST-100 Starliner space taxi today by executing an end-to-end test of its rocket-powered launch abort system — a test that did what it needed to do even though one of the craft's three parachutes didn't open. Data from the pad abort test at the U.S. Army's White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico will be fully analyzed in advance of an uncrewed Starliner mission to the International Space Station and back, currently scheduled for a Dec. 17 launch, Boeing and NASA said. “Tests like this one are crucial to… Read More


11/02/2019   Yahoo! Science

Cygnus cargo ship heads to space station with satellite built by students in SeattleNorthrop Grumman launched a robotic Cygnus cargo capsule to the International Space Station today, marking one giant leap for a small satellite built by students at the University of Washington and Seattle's Raisbeck Aviation High School. The 7-pound HuskySat-1 was among 8,200 pounds of supplies, equipment and scientific payloads packed aboard the Cygnus for liftoff atop Northrop Grumman's Antares rocket at 9:59 a.m. ET (6:59 a.m. PT) from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on the Virginia coast. Hundreds of onlookers cheered as the rocket rose into sunny skies after a trouble-free countdown. "Good launch all the way around," launch conductor Adam… Read More


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