News & Information       http://info.owt.com
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
IPHONE users will be able to free up some precious space on their smartphone when they install Apple’s latest operating system update. The new...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Before President Donald Trump signed a sweeping executive...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Ford is investing $1.2 billion in three Michigan facilities, including an engine plant where it plans to add 130 jobs. President Donald Trump, who has pressured automakers to invest more and create jobs in the U.S., applauded the move Tuesday in an early morning tweet. “Big announcement by Ford today. Major investment to be made in three Michigan plants. Car companies coming back to...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
As particles on Titan collide in 15mph winds, they become frictionally charged, like a balloon rubbed against hair. This causes them to clump together, according to Georgia Tech researchers. ......
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
On Monday, April 3 at 10 a.m., Mayor Madeline Rogero, Knoxville Police Chief David Rausch, Overcoming Believers Senior Pastor Daryl Arnold, Change Center Executive Director Nicole Chandler, elected officials, partners and community members will gather to break down walls as work on The Change Center begins at...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Cisco Blog > Security Security Michele Guel - March 28, 2017 - 0 Comments This blog is the first in a series of posts featuring perspectives from Cisco women in security. Next month's blog will feature Chief Privacy Officer, Michelle Dennedy. When I started my information security career at NASA's Ames Research Center in 1988, there were very few women in the field. In fact, I'd attend conferences in which I was literally the only female participant. Back then, I launched and managed the information security program for the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility at Ames. I was greatly encouraged by the support I received at NASA Ames. Still, the lack of gender diversity within my...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Tuesday, March 28, 2017 WASHINGTON, D.C. - U.S. Senators Angus King (I-Maine) and Cory Booker (D-N.J.) today reintroduced the Community Broadband Act, legislation that would preserve and protect the rights of cities and localities to invest in local broadband infrastructure. Municipal broadband can often provide an affordable, reliable option for many rural and low-income communities that continue to face persistent barriers to high-speed internet access. In Maine, the Town of Rockport and the Cities of South Portland and Sanford have successfully launched ultra-fast public-private broadband projects, with several...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Underground pipelines are among the most valuable, yet neglected assets in the public arena. They provide essential services such as the supply of drinking water and collection of wastewater. Despite their critical importance, for decades many municipal utilities have operated under a 'bury and forget' mentality - with little emphasis on long-term management of their aging pipelines - at least until something goes wrong. Then they must fix the problem under emergency conditions, often considering only immediate needs and not the future operation of the pipeline in question. North American utilities face a tipping point In many cases, the issue has less to do with 'bury and forget' and more...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
In the first postin this series, we covered the incredible growth of the four horsemen -- Apple, Google, Facebook and Amazon -- and discussed why they continue to grow, even as they've already reached an unprecedented scale and size. Surprisingly, these four horsemen aren't out to trample service providers: They hardly think of them at all. What these companies do obsess over is creating value for their customers. They identify critical (usually simple) business and consumer problems and build devices and services to solve these problems as fast and as well as they can. Service providers should embrace many of the qualities that have made the four horsemen such fast-growing, dominant...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Cisco Blog > Partner Partner Karin Surber - March 28, 2017 - 0 Comments Other than when I'm traveling for business, I work 100% from home and enjoy the flexibility and savings it provides. I save on dry cleaning, auto fuel and lunches and even get to sleep in a little longer because my morning commute only requires walking down the hall to my home office. The key to my ability to be productive at home is the technology available to me. I use my laptop, WebEx, Cisco Jabber and a Cisco DX-80 and am connected directly to the Cisco internal network through my CVO router. Actually, through these capabilities, I really feel I'm more productive working from home than when I'm in the company office....
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Dr. William M. Lee DALLAS - March 28, 2017 - A multicenter study on acute liver failure funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) has increased understanding of this sometimes fatal condition since the research effort began 20 years ago, improving patient care and saving lives. The Acute Liver Failure Study Group, now active at 12 sites in the U.S. and Canada, including UT Southwestern Medical Center, recently recruited its 3,000 participant. Information gathered from those patients over the years has given physicians a clearer picture of what acute liver failure (ALF) looks like and how best to treat it - as well as how acetaminophen poisoning became the No. 1 cause of ALF in the...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Cisco Blog > Data Center Data Center Zack Kielich - March 28, 2017 - 0 Comments Contributors: Kurt Milne The big news in March for cloud was the AWS S3 outage that brought down some large pieces of the Internet with it. While the world didn't end, it definetly caused issues and illustrated the need for a cloud strategy that accounts for vendor failure. But managing multiple clouds, accounts, and capabilities-that sounds too complex, doesn't it? Traditionally, you had only a couple of choices on how to manage hybrid cloud or multi-cloud service delivery, usually causing you to use multiple sets of orchestration and management tools that are technology or cloud specific. The better...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
CHENEY, Wash. - Eastern Washington University will send a record number of students to the 31st annual National Conference on Undergraduate Research (NCUR), April 6-8, on the campus of the University of Memphis, Tennessee. In all, 57 Eastern students - twice...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
HEBRON, Ky., March 28, 2017 - Legrand, the global specialist in electrical and digital building infrastructures, announced that its Nuvo Player Portfolio whole home audio system is now supported by HomeSeer, a third-party home control platform. No updating of Nuvo...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Faster, market competitive and safer airplane repairs. That's the goal of a project by The University of Akron and Airborne Maintenance and Engineering Services in obtaining Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) approval for 'cold spray' repair of corroded and worn parts on commercial aircraft. Promising demonstrations and test results of this application were showcased at Airborne Maintenance and Engineering Services at the Wilmington Air Park on March 27. Members of the Ohio General Assembly - including Speaker of the Ohio House of Representatives Cliff Rosenberger and Ohio Senate President Pro Tempore Bob Peterson - viewed progress of Supersonic Particle Deposition (SPD), a groundbreaking...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
The East Bay Green Jobs and Career Fair, scheduled from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, April 15 at Mount Zion Missionary Baptist Church in West Oakland, could become a turning point for Oakland and the Bay Area. Organized by the Green Faith Coalition, the upcoming fair is designed to create pathways out of poverty, promoting green employment for underserved East Bay community members. “While the green tech sector is growing throughout California, it is not sufficiently inclusive,” writes Susan Stephenson, executive director of Interfaith Power and Light (IPL). “We still have far too many low-income...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
By MATTHEW DALY and JILL COLVIN WASHINGTON (AP) — Declaring “the start of a new era” in energy production, President Donald Trump signed an executive order Tuesday that he said would revive the coal industry and create jobs. The move makes good on his campaign pledge to unravel former President Barack Obama’s plan to curb global warming. The order seeks to suspend, rescind or flag for review more than a half-dozen measures in an effort to boost domestic energy production in the form of fossil fuels. Environmental activists, including former Vice President Al Gore, denounced the plan. But Trump said the effort would allow workers to “succeed on a level playing...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
A team of astrophysicists has discovered that supermassive black holes at the centre of galaxies aren't just destroyers of stars, but also their creators. ......
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Press Releases March 28, 2017 WASHINGTON, D.C. - Today, Representative Charlie Dent (PA-15) joined House colleagues Jim Himes (CT-4) and Lou Barletta (PA-11) in introducing H.R. 1732, the Synthetic Drug Control Act of 2017, which would address the dangerous use of synthetic drugs by blocking the sale of the deadly compounds that are used to develop those drugs. 'The devastation that synthetic substances and drugs have caused in my district and across the country is heartbreaking. Protecting our...
03/28/2017   WorldNews Science
Location: Pittsburgh, Pa. Date: March 28, 2017 Michael Baker International, a global leader in engineering, planning and consulting services today announced that Elese (Lisa) Roger has joined the firm as Executive Vice President and Chief Information Officer. She will be based in the firm's Pittsburgh headquarters and will report to Michael Baker CEO, Brian A. Lutes. As a member of the executive leadership team, Ms. Roger will align her department's skills and capabilities to make sure the most cost-efficient and effective technological...
03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

'Monster' cyclone Debbie batters northeast AustraliaA "monster" cyclone that smashed into northeast Australia with coastal residents battling lashing rain and howling winds was downgraded to a tropical low system on Wednesday as Australians got ready to assess the damage. There were fears its arrival would coincide with early morning high tides and cause severe flooding, but it slowed before making landfall between the towns of Bowen and Airlie Beach in the early afternoon. Great Barrier Reef islands popular with foreign tourists were also battered.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

Why One Woman Had Oil in Her Lung for DecadesAn elderly woman in Florida had oil in her lungs — for decades — from a now-outdated procedure she received in her 20s to treat tuberculosis (TB), according to a new report of the woman's case. This cloudy area was concerning to her doctors, because it could have meant that she had fluid buildup in the space between her chest wall and her lung, known as the pleural cavity. However, the woman remembered having oil injected into her lungs decades earlier, as a treatment for tuberculosis.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

Programme to be axed by Trump saves energyVoluntary efficiency programmes -- including one targeted for elimination by the Trump administration -- have led to energy savings of up to 30 percent in commercial buildings in Los Angeles, researchers have reported. Describing their study as the first large-scale analysis of green certification schemes for big buildings, a pair of researchers from the University of California at Los Angeles reviewed data on nearly 179,000 properties in the city. "We found that -- with the programmes -- there is a significant improvement in energy efficiency," said co-author Magali Delmas, an environmental economist.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

Scientists make breakthrough in synthetic blood, but won’t ditch donations just yetScientists from the University of Bristol and NHS Blood and Transplant announced a recent breakthrough that makes it possible to mass produce red blood cells, opening the door for the wide-scale use of manufactured blood.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

Samsung has plan for recalled phonesFox Business Briefs: 3/28/17


03/28/2017   Wired Science
Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything But Bleed
An organ-on-chip model of the female reproductive tract includes a miniature ovary, uterus, fallopian tube, cervix, and liver. The post Scientists Build a Menstrual Biochip That Does Everything But Bleed appeared first on WIRED.
03/28/2017   Wired Science
In Science, You Can’t Always Get What You Want
Science experiments don't always provide the data needed to definitively answer a question. Such is the nature of science. The post In Science, You Can't Always Get What You Want appeared first on WIRED.
03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

SpaceX is about to make history by relaunching a used Falcon 9 rocketThe Falcon 9 first stage that is relaunching this week. On Thursday, SpaceX is set to launch yet another satellite into orbit from the Florida coast — but this mission will be far from routine for the company. The Falcon 9 rocket that SpaceX is using for the launch has already flown before.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

Wild Thai tiger cub footage sparks hope for endangered speciesConservationists on Tuesday hailed the discovery of a new breeding population of tigers in Thailand as a "miraculous" victory for a sub-species nearly wiped out by poaching. Images of some tigers including six cubs, captured by camera traps in an eastern Thai jungle throughout 2016, confirm the presence of what is only the world's second known breeding population of the endangered Indochinese tiger. The only other growing population -- the largest in the world with about three dozen tigers -- is based in a western forest corridor in Thailand near the border with Myanmar.


03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

It's time to let a robot invasion stop the Lionfish explosionUndoing man's folly is, sometimes, a robot's work. Unwittingly introduced to the Atlantic Ocean over a quarter of a century ago, the lionfish, which is native to the Pacific, is responsible for an ecological disaster of epic proportions in the Caribbean, Bermuda's, and off the shore of Florida coast, and it's spreading up the coast. A complete lack of predators, voracious appetite and ability to reproduce at an astonishing rate has resulted in a mushrooming lionfish population that is decimating ecosystems, coral reefs and the fishing business.  SEE ALSO: A fish that doesn't belong is wreaking havoc on our ocean Catching and eating lionfish, which are delicious, sounds like a reasonable solution, but the fish can't be netted, and are generally fished one person and one spear at a time. If fisherman can't catch lionfish en masse, they can't sell them at quantities to food stores and restaurants. Supply creates demand, which generates more demand that fisherman can supply. If they can figure out how to catch the fish. RISE, which stands for Robots in Service of the Environment, has come up with a very 21st century solution to the lionfish disaster: robots. "Erika and I love diving and, through diving, became increasingly aware of the crisis," said Colin Angle who co-founded RISE with his wife Erika. Angle is also the co-founder and CEO of iRobot (Roomba robot vacuum, Packbot military robot). On one dive, their boat captain challenged Angle, "Okay, you build robots, build one to go hunt lionfish." This was not as crazy of an idea as it sounds and Angle had already been wondering "if there was still a way to use robot technology to solve larger environmental problems and maybe more proactively than merely sending our defense robots to natural disaster zones." The Lionfish challenge Image: rise Robots for good sounds cheesy, but there were more practical considerations. Could, Angle wondered, a robot even do the job and could it do it at scale? "Spending half a million dollars to build a robot that kill 10 lionfish is absurd," he told me. Angle shared a few details of the robot they built and that will make its public debut next month. They started with fresh-water electro fishing technology and adapted it for salt water. The robot stuns, but doesn't kill the lionfish and then it sucks them into the robot. It does this over and over again, until full of unconscious fish and then rises to the surface where a fisherman can unload the catch and deliver them to waiting restaurants and food stores. "Ultimately, the control of this device is like a PlayStation game: you're looking at screen and using a joystick controller. Zap it, catch it, do it again, said RISE Executive Director John Rizzi who told me that a team of unpaid volunteers have been working on the prototype for over a year. They also got some seed funding from The Angle Family, Schmidt Marine Technology Partners and the Anthropocene Institute. Stunning, eating and feeding brains RISE is a two-pronged effort: slow damaging growth of the lionfish population and create a rich curriculum around this and future RISE work that can be used in American middle schools. Erika Angle, herself a biochemist, has spent a decade working with the non-profit Science from Scientist, which brings real scientists into classrooms where they not only talk about their work, but offer hands-on science demonstrations. "It's such an integral part of RISE mission...We're trying to reach these kids with knowledge. Ultimately, we’re going to be relying on these kids to save planet for next generation," said Erika Angle.  RISE will, she said, build a curriculum around the RISE lionfish robot that can go anywhere in the country. While there's currently no plan for a practical lesson, like going on a boat and piloting one of the robot-catching fish, that could happen in the future. For now, though, the biggest demonstration of the RISE's lionfish hunter will happen in Bermuda on April 19, as part of the America's Cup festivities. There'll even been a celebrity chef lionfish cook-off, the 11th Hour Racing #EatLionfish Chef's Throwdown. All of it designed to help launch RISE's Kickstarter project, which Colin Angle hopes can help raise funds to further developer, build and deliver these robots to commercial fishermen and woman at about $500-to-$1,000 each. What if the robot is so effective, it wipes out the lionfish in the Atlantic? "That's a perverse reality you can worry about, but we're confident that the lionfish can reproduce so quickly [one fish produces 30,000-to-40,000 eggs every few days] that it would be hard to eliminate them," said Rizzi. Colin, though, reminded me that that's still the goal. "This is an invasive species," he said. A significant reduction in lionfish numbers would help the fish and reef ecosystem to recover. There is another benefit to using robots like this to solve ecological problems. "Unlike biological systems that once you deploy are out of your control, this one you can simply turn off," said Angle. WATCH: Invasion of the lionfish - Part 1 - The threat  


03/28/2017   Wired Science
The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery
Satellite companies have mountains of data. Some of them analyze in-house, while others sell their data. Who will dominate the new space information economy? The post The Race to Rule the High-Flying Business of Satellite Imagery appeared first on WIRED.
03/28/2017   Yahoo! Science

3,800-year-old tomb found in Egypt linked to brother of powerful governor of ElephantineA tomb thought to be that of the brother of one of the most important governors of Egypt's 12th dynasty, Sarenput II, has been unearthed at the site of Qubbet el-Hawa, on the western bank of the Nile. A number of elite burials are known to be located at Qubbet el-Hawa, many dating from the time of the Old Kingdom of Egypt (2649-2150 BC). This tomb dates back to roughly 3,800 years ago and was discovered during excavations by the Spanish Archaeological Mission led by Dr Alejandro Jimenez-Serrano.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

The DNA of oil wells - U.S. shale enlists genetics to boost outputA small group of U.S. oil producers has been trying to exploit advances in DNA science to wring more crude from shale rock, as the domestic energy industry keeps pushing relentlessly to cut costs and compete with the world's top exporters. Shale producers have slashed production costs as much as 50 percent over two years, waging a price war with the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). Now, U.S. shale producers can compete in a $50-per-barrel oil market, and about a dozen shale companies are seeking to cut costs further by analyzing DNA samples extracted from oil wells to identify promising spots to drill.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

New species of 'Maerdy Monster' millipede found in South Wales coal mineA group of naturalists surveying the Maerdy colliery site in the Rhondda Valley has unearthed a new species of arthropod. The brown-hued millipede has been nicknamed the 'Maerdy Monster' and is thought to be the first arthropod found in Britain for over 33 years. Scientist Liam Olds said: "It's not every day that you find a species new to science.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

Study predicts significant Southern California beach erosionLOS ANGELES (AP) — More than half of Southern California's beaches could completely erode back to coastal infrastructure or sea cliffs by the year 2100 as the sea level rises, according to a study released Monday.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

Uber's self-driving car program resumes after crashWilliam La Jeunesse tells us why on 'Special Report'


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

This is one of the best-ever views of Earth from spaceIt's a view that very few people will ever get to see firsthand: Legs dangling in free fall above the Earth with nothing but empty space between you and the planet's blue surface 250 miles below.  If you're an astronaut on a spacewalk, however, this vertigo-inducing perspective is something you'll need to get used to, and fast.  SEE ALSO: NASA Space Selfie Is Out of This World NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough shared his unique perspective with people on social media after he ventured outside the International Space Station for a spacewalk on March 24.  View of our spectacular planet (and my boots) during the #spacewalk yesterday with @Thom_astro. pic.twitter.com/mCMd7aSLha — Shane Kimbrough (@astro_kimbrough) March 25, 2017 Spacewalking, which involves donning a bulky spacesuit to leave the relative safety of the Space Station, is one of the more dangerous activities an astronaut can take part in while in orbit.  Astronauts use tethers to move around outside of the laboratory, and even simple tasks, like using a wrench or removing and replacing experiments, can be strenuous in the extreme environment. Even moving your hands in the bulky gloves attached to a spacesuit can be difficult.  That said, NASA mission controllers monitor the astronauts the entire time they're moving around outside the station, giving them instructions and helping them through difficult tasks as needed. A spacewalk selfie of Shane Kimbrough snapped on March 24. Image: nasa Kimbrough stepped outside for his walk with European Space Agency astronaut Thomas Pesquet in order to perform some maintenance on the orbiting outpost. The two astronauts were outside for about 6.5 hours in total.  This is only the start of a series of spacewalks planned for the Space Station in the next week.  Kimbrough and NASA's Peggy Whitson will also head out into the vacuum of space for another spacewalk on March 30. And on April 6, Whitson and Pesquet will leave the airlock for the last spacewalk in the series. WATCH: Astronaut Scott Kelly takes first space walk  


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

New calls for tech companies to monitor suspicious activityReaction from Ron Hosko, former FBI assistant director


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

Elon Musk's new co could allow uploading, downloading thoughts: Wall Street Journal(Reuters) - Tesla Inc founder and Chief Executive Elon Musk has launched a company called Neuralink Corp through which computers could merge with human brains, the Wall Street Journal reported, citing people familiar with the matter. Neuralink is pursuing what Musk calls the "neural lace" technology, implanting tiny brain electrodes that may one day upload and download thoughts, the Journal reported. It is unclear what sorts of products Neuralink might create, but people who have had discussions with the company describe a strategy similar to space launch company SpaceX and Tesla, the Journal report said.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

Giant ancient palace unearthed in Mexico was the ruler's home and the seat of governmentThe remains of an ancient palace complex dating back 2,300 years have been unearthed Mexico's Valley of Oaxaca. It is the oldest royal building excavated to date in the area, providing some of the earliest evidence of early states' emergence in Mesoamerica. Finding evidence for the emergence of early state societies is a major challenge for archaeologists.


03/27/2017   Wired Science
A Russian Volcano Just Erupted for the First Time in Centuries
Kambalny, the southernmost volcano in Kamchatka, erupted unexpectedly over the weekend, sending ash up over the Pacific Ocean. The post A Russian Volcano Just Erupted for the First Time in Centuries appeared first on WIRED.
03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

EU nations vote against GM crops, but not enough to block themA majority of EU countries voted on Monday against allowing two new genetically modified crops to be grown in Europe, batting the contentious decision on GM cultivation in Europe back to the EU executive, according to two sources. EU governments were asked to vote on the future of two grades of GM maize, Pioneer's 1507 and Syngenta's Bt11, which kill insects by producing their own pesticide and are also resistant to a particular herbicide.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

What I Really Worry About When It Comes to North KoreaOur preventative measures are looking less preventative.


03/27/2017   Yahoo! Science

Shrine Over Jesus' Tomb in Danger of 'Catastrophic' CollapseA shrine built over a cave that is revered as the tomb of Jesus is in danger of "catastrophic" collapse, according to a report by National Geographic. The shrine (or the "Edicule," as it is often called) is located within the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in Jerusalem. According to legend, Helena, the mother of emperor Constantine the Great (A.D. 272-337) visited Jerusalem in the fourth century and discovered the cave where Jesus was buried after being crucified.


03/27/2017   Wired Science
Scientists Hack a Human Cell and Reprogram It Like a Computer
By hijacking the DNA of a human cell, they showed it's possible to program it like a simple computer. The post Scientists Hack a Human Cell and Reprogram It Like a Computer appeared first on WIRED.
03/27/2017   Wired Science
Stentors: The Tiny Giants That Ink Like Squid and Regenerate Like Wolverine
The stentor is one of the strangest, most mysterious organisms on Earth, and it just might be swimming in a pond near you. The post Stentors: The Tiny Giants That Ink Like Squid and Regenerate Like Wolverine appeared first on WIRED.
03/27/2017   Wired Science
Social Media Influencers Finally Come to … Medicine
The gig economy isn't just for website designers and juice cleanse diet diehards anymore. The post Social Media Influencers Finally Come to ... Medicine appeared first on WIRED.
03/26/2017   Wired Science
Evolution Is Slower Than It Looks and Faster Than You Think
Examine evolution over the course of years or centuries, and you'll find that it progresses much more quickly than it does over geologic time. What gives? The post Evolution Is Slower Than It Looks and Faster Than You Think appeared first on WIRED.
03/25/2017   Wired Science
Meet the Woman Who Can See With Her Ears
Nearly three decades after losing her sight, Pat discovers a new way to see. The post Meet the Woman Who Can See With Her Ears appeared first on WIRED.
03/24/2017   Wired Science
How Can You Measure How Much Pain a Baby Feels?
The FDA is issuing a new warning on anesthesia for infants, and it poses a difficult question for doctors. What's more dangerous: pain or pain treatment? The post How Can You Measure How Much Pain a Baby Feels? appeared first on WIRED.

Science