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10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
We live in a day and age where we are are fairly well-versed with our surroundings. By that, I’m talking not just about our immediate surroundings here in earth, but also that of the earth in the solar system. The planets, their satellites, the asteroids and other heavenly bodies in the neighbourhood of our home planet have been well established now. And yet, not long ago, we were still peering at the skies, discovering new planets and their satellites. William Lassell was...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Space Science Image of the Week: This colourful image captured during the summer’s total solar eclipse shows what the Sun is made of ......
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Christopher Wray made the claims while speaking at the International Association of Chiefs of Police conference in Philadelphia. ......
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
The study was carried out by researchers at New York University, and is discussed in a new book by Professor John Bargh, a psychology expert at Yale (stock). ......
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Mumbai: Cricket fans at the Wankhede Stadium here were left amazed after a ball boy took a stunning one-handed catch off Virat Kohli’s shot during the first ODI between...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Kaspersky Lab will ask independent parties to conduct security reviews of its widely used anti-virus software to help dispel allegations that the Russian government uses the products to conduct espionage, the Moscow-based company said on Monday. Kaspersky said in a statement that it would submit the source code of its software and future product updates for review by “the broader...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Have cars, will travel. I’m an old-car enthusiast, so each October, I make a trek to a huge antique auto event in Pennsylvania. Last year, I took a Chrysler Pacifica minivan to get there. But for 2017, a Pacifica plug-in hybrid (PHEV) version has been added. With the same three occupants, same route, and same amount of stuff, the race was on to see how much better the hybrid could do. Last year’s conventional Pacifica Limited rang in at a base price of $52,995, before numerous options brought it to $60,445. My hybrid, in Platinum trim, was fully loaded at $56,495. But there’s a bit more to it: I live in the very generous province of Ontario, which hands back a $14,000 “green” rebate on the...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
LONDON: Your pet may be deliberately making the cute puppy-dog eyes, say scientists who found that dogs produce more facial expressions when humans are looking at them. Scientists at University of Portsmouth in the UK are the first to find clear evidence dogs move their faces in direct response to human attention. Dogs do not respond with more facial expressions upon seeing tasty food,...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
(credit: Patrick Shepherd/CIFOR) It’s a common suggestion that we should just plant trees to suck CO2 out of the atmosphere, but this isn’t quite the solution it...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
(credit: NIAID / Flickr) On February 24, 1988, Richard Lenski seeded 12 flasks with E. coli and set them up to shake overnight at 37ºC. But he seeded them with only enough nutrients to grow...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Have you ever wondered whether your pooch is trying to tell you something by giving you puppy dog eyes? ......
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Cisco Blog > Data Center Data Center Samar Sharma - October 23, 2017 - 0 Comments Traditional load-balancers have operated at multi-Gbps speeds. Our recent inventions allow us to scale the...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
The Public Health (Minimum Price for Alcohol) (Wales) Bill, has been introduced before the National Assembly for Wales today by the Public Health Minister, Rebecca Evans. The Bill will address longstanding and specific health concerns around the effects of excess alcohol consumption, which is estimated to lead to 50,000 alcohol-related hospital admissions a year, costing the Welsh NHS £120m annually. In 2015, there were 463 alcohol-related deaths in Wales. The new Bill supports the Welsh Government's comprehensive strategy to tackle harmful and hazardous drinking by tackling the availability and affordability of cheap, strong alcohol, which is...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
On Thursday 27 September, the doors of Upptech, the University's new technology research centre, were officially opened. Ångström Laboratory was filled with university employees and representatives from the private sector, who enjoyed inaugural speeches, mingling, entertainment and dinner. Business giant Anders Wall was one of many attendees at the inauguration of Upptech, the centre that will promote the University's research, education and innovation in technology. The hope is to make the University's researchers and students more attractive on the market and increase funding to research projects, with collaboration playing a central role. This is what Maria Strømme,...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
The bridge being printed. Image: Olivier de Gruijter Imperial researchers are part of a team testing a 3D printed footbridge due to be installed across a canal in Amsterdam in 2018. The team, led by the The Alan Turing Institute and 3D printing company MX3D, will measure, monitor and analyse the performance of the 12 metre-long stainless steel bridge, which will be the world's largest 3D printed metal structure. About a third of the bridge has already been printed in a lab in the Netherlands, and it is due to be installed in late 2018. It will cross the busy Oudezijds Achterburgwal canal in central Amsterdam, and will be open to pedestrians and cyclists. A vast sensor network will be...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Daimler subsidiary Mercedes-Benz Energy and enercity put mass storage unit from electromotive battery systems into operation 1800 of more than 3000 replacement battery parts already 'in stock' Completion of the 17.4 MWh accumulator is planned for the start of 2018 Efficient dual use of the battery systems improves the LCA and the life cycle costs of electric mobility Prequalification confirmed through regional transmission system operator TenneT Hanover/Kamenz - The cooperation partners Daimler AG with its hundred-percent subsidiary Mercedes-Benz Energy GmbH and enercity (Stadtwerke Hannover AG) have put one of the biggest battery systems in Europe into operation following a construction...
10/23/2017   Wired Science
Do three warm winters in a row mean the planet is warming faster, or is the trend just part of normal seasonal variability?
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Single board design simplifies the evaluation process On-board embedded debugger alleviates the need for external JTAG debugger saving cost for customers October 23, 2017 TDK Corporation announces the worldwide availability of the SmartMotion Platform encompassing 4unique development kits. The SmartMotion development kits enable rapid evaluation and development of InvenSense MEMS sensor-based solutions. Built on a single board design, the platform enables fast system prototyping and parallel software development, resulting in faster deployment of end products to market. The SmartMotion platform is designed around Microchip's G55MCU with built-in 512KB of Flash Memory and incorporates...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
Manufacturing investment slowdown amid current uncertainties - EEF/Santander survey Concerns over adoption of Automation and impact on productivity In the past two years manufacturers invested 6.5% of turnover in new plant and machinery, down from 7.5% last year. The slowdown was predicted in last year's report, given uncertainty surrounding Brexit Looking ahead, a majority of manufacturers (51.1%) intend to spend more on plant and machinery over the coming two years. It remains finely balanced however. For those who intend to spend more, there is a need to replace equipment which is becoming obsolete, as well as take advantage of new opportunities on the back of an improved global outlook....
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
ICM-20789: 7-Axis motion and pressure sensor (3-axis Accel, 3-axis gyro, 1-axis pressure) targeting the consumer electronic, drone, and IoT markets. Smallest footprint and easiest implementation of any motion and pressure sensing solution. Combining the industry's most precise 'relative pressure' sensor with TDK's performance leading 6-axis motion sensing technology. October 23, 2017 TDK Corporation announces the immediate worldwide availability of the InvenSense ICM-20789MEMS 7-axis integrated inertial device combining a 3-axis gyroscope, 3-axis accelerometer and an ultra-low noise MEMS capacitive barometric pressure sensor. The ICM-20789encompasses a single small footprint, with the...
10/23/2017   WorldNews Science
FY2017 1st Half Financial Results (Ended September 20, 2017) FY2017 2nd Half and Full-year Forecasts (Ending February 28, 2018) Notes: Yaskawa Electric changes its accounting period from March 20 to the last day of Febguary starting FY2017. The figures of FY2017 forecasts〈Reference basis〉in this document are based on the assumption that the accounting period remains unchanged. (from March 21, 2017 to March 20, 2018) (Please refer to the appendix on page 18 for details.) The information within this document is made as of the date of writing. Any forward-looking statements are made according to the assumptions of management and are...
10/23/2017   Yahoo! Science

Fusion Energy: How Scientists Are Creating Plasma Hotter Than the Sun in Quest for Limitless Clean EnergyIn a study published in Nature Physics in June, John Wright, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and colleagues showed how they had developed a new way to heat fusion plasma in tokamaks. Fusion energy uses the same principles as how the sun is powered. The technique involves three ion species—hydrogen, deuterium and helium-3.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Rex Tillerson Seeks Help From Arab Nations in the U.S. Effort to Isolate IranIn visits to Saudi Arabia and Qatar, Tillerson denounced Iran's "malign behavior"


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Trump Urges House Republicans to Move Quickly on the Budget and on Tax CutsTrump's plans would slash the corporate tax rate to 20 percent


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Jurors to begin deliberating in meningitis outbreak caseJury deliberations are set to begin in the case of a Massachusetts pharmacist charged with murder in the 2012 meningitis outbreak that killed 76 people. Jurors in Glenn Chin's case are expected to start ...


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Japanese Prime Minister Abe Wins Big In National ElectionsThe prime minister's gamble on snap elections paid off in a big way: a two-thirds majority in parliament


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Technology takeover in the kitchenHas artificial intelligence gone too far?


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

'It was going to eat her' - Aussie teen survives shark scareAn Australian teenager has survived a terrifying encounter with a great white shark, with her harrowing screams alerting her father who was certain it was about to "eat her". Sarah Williams, 15, was fishing for squid from a kayak off the South Australian coast near Normanville on Sunday when the shark struck. "This shark has just rolled and all I saw was the dark side and the white belly and just huge fins and just white water everywhere," he told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation on Monday.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Prepare for liftoff! 17 upcoming space missions worth getting excited aboutThe space agencies around the globe are designing an array of sophisticated probes to investigate our galactic backyard and beyond. Here's a timeline of future space missions set for the next decade.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Transgender fish filmed changing sex for BBC’s Blue Planet IIMating is never easy when you have an unsightly bulbous appendage protruding from your head. But the male Asian Sheepshead Wrasse has even greater problems to contend with. The female wrasse is endowed with the extraordinary ability to unexpectedly switch gender, a change which not only scuppers any burgeoning relationship with the male but also creates another headache for him - a new love rival. The gender-bending ability of the wrasse has been captured in detail for the first time for BBC Blue Planet II which airs on Sunday. The female kobudai (left) becomes even bigger than the male after transforming  Credit:  Tony Wu Scientists believe the female wrasse makes the switch because she can pass on more genes as a male, although it is unclear why some change while others remain female. It is just one of dozens of filming and scientific firsts captured over four years by the production team who also recorded huge flying fish which snatch birds from the sky, boiling seas, and  armour clad octopuses. A giant trevally leaps from the water to catch a tern in flight  Credit: BBC  Sir David Attenborough, who narrates the new series, said he was most impressed with new footage showing the efforts of the male anemone fish. “There have been a lot of really important scientific discoveries,” he told The Telegraph. “There’s a little anemone fish off the reef living in the sand that is surrounded by dangers but it finds refuge in the tentacles of an anemone, because it alone is immune to their poison. “But the female has to lay eggs, and she can’t do that on the soft tentacles of an anemone. So the little male goes around trying to find something where she could lay safely. “He finds an empty coconut shell, but the trouble is it’s miles away from the safety of the anemone. So he decides he’s going pull the thing all the way back. So he struggles with it, and the triumph on his little face when he does.” Filming The new series comes sixteen years after the original Blue Planet aired, and filmmakers have taken advantage of the latest marine science and cutting-edge technology to mount 125 expeditions across 39 countries, and spent more than 6,000 hours diving. The crews managed to film animal behaviour that until now has been rejected as just sailors myths. Two minutes with legendary nature presenter Sir David Attenborough 02:12 Mark Brownlow, Series Producer, said: “What’s exciting is we are working with scientists and we are helping them further their science. “Often the logistics is too massive for them to independently launch their own expedition but by collaborating we work together. “A really good example is the common octopus near Cape Town and when this octopus feels threatened it picks up stones, and shells on the seabed and wraps them around itself and it seems to be a protective coat. “Not only does it camouflage but it actually seems to be using the shells as a shield and we filmed that for the first time.” Blue Planet II : The Prequel 05:06 The team said the programmes were the most authentic ever, after the BBC Natural History Unit has faced criticism in the past for filming footage in zoos rather than in the natural world. Sir David said: “To say that we are distorting natural history would be absurd. However we wouldn’t do that now, I don’t think, because we are being very very meticulous to be correct and not in anyway misleading. “We do our best to be as honest as we can, and the Natural History Unit is extremely careful about constructing stories from too many sources.” False Killer Whales travelling with a pod of oceanic Bottlenose dolphins off the coast of the North Island, New Zealand Credit: Richard Robinson BBC  James Honeybourne, Executive Producer, added: It’s very important to us that we are true to nature. “We are very honest about all the techniques we use to create that, to tell as story. If you film something that’s microscopic you have to put added light on it, that’s just the simple laws of physics. “We don’t want to point that out in every episode you don’t want to break the spell, but we want to be upfront about that.” Blue Planet IIstarts Sunday 29 October 8pm on BBC One.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Stephen Hawking makes one of his most famous research papers available onlineMore than 50 years ago, Stephen Hawking wrote his doctoral thesis on how universes expand.  On Monday morning (GMT), that research became available for anyone to read through a digital library maintained by the University of Cambridge.  SEE ALSO: Researchers watched as gold was made millions of light-years from Earth “By making my PhD thesis Open Access, I hope to inspire people around the world to look up at the stars and not down at their feet; to wonder about our place in the universe and to try and make sense of the cosmos," Hawking said in a statement.   Hawking's 1966 thesis, " Properties of expanding universes," is the most requested item in the University of Cambridge's open access repository. The catalogue record gets hundreds of views per month, according to the the university. In recent months, hundreds of readers have made requests to download the entire thesis.  Hawking gave his permission to make the document available, and Cambridge officials hope his decision prompts current students to provide the same public access to their work and encourage its former academics to do the same. (The university has been home to 98 Nobel Prize recipients.) The historic Cambridge University Library maintains the physical papers of scientists like Isaac Newton and Charles Darwin and has made their research data available online.  "Anyone, anywhere in the world should have free, unhindered access to not just my research, but to the research of every great and enquiring mind across the spectrum of human understanding," Hawking said.  WATCH: Astronauts finally brought a fidget spinner to space


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Elon Musk wants to whisk you from NYC to DC in 30 minutes with a new HyperloopElon Musk revealed in July that he had received verbal government approval for The Boring Company to build an underground system that will take commuters from New York to Philadelphia to Baltimore to Washington, D.C.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

NASA decides to hang out at dwarf planet Ceres just a little while longerWith its hardware already right where it needs to be, NASA has decided it wants to extend its Dawn mission, which will bring its spacecraft extremely close to the surface of one of the most interesting objects in our Solar System that isn't a planet. NASA has so many spacecraft making groundbreaking discoveries around the solar system that it can actually be hard to keep track of them all, so you'd be forgiven if the name Dawn sounds new. The space agency's Dawn mission began in earnest in early 2015 when its observational spacecraft reached Ceres, the large dwarf planet hanging out in the asteroid belt situated between Mars and Jupiter. Now, the spacecraft is going to perform its most daring move. In its extended mission, the Dawn craft may get the opportunity to get up-close-and-personal with Ceres. NASA is considering different flight plans that could bring the machine within 120 miles from the surface of the dwarf planet, which is incredibly close. During this extra mission time, the Dawn team plans to capture lots of images of the rocky world in the visible light spectrum in order to study its geology. Likewise, the craft's various instruments will continue to capture and send back valuable data that researchers will no doubt be excited to examine. "The Dawn team is currently refining its plans for this next and final chapter of the mission," NASA says. "Because of its commitment to protect Ceres from Earthly contamination, Dawn will not land or crash into Ceres. Instead, it will carry out as much science as it can in its final planned orbit, where it will stay even after it can no longer communicate with Earth. Mission planners estimate the spacecraft can continue operating until the second half of 2018."


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Astronomers measure Milky Way with radio wavesALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A collection of radio telescopes that spans thousands of miles and is remotely operated from central New Mexico has measured a span of 66,000 light-years (one light-year is equal to 6 trillion miles) from Earth across the Milky Way's center to a star-forming area near the edge of the other side of the galaxy.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Director James Toback Accused of Sexual Harassment by 38 WomenToback allegedly made promisees of stardom


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Jimmy Carter Wants to Help President Trump Resolve the North Korea Crisis“I told him that I was available if they ever need me”


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Einstein's theory of happy living emerges in Tokyo noteA note that Albert Einstein gave to a courier in Tokyo, briefly describing his theory on happy living, has surfaced after 95 years and is up for auction in Jerusalem. The year was 1922, and the German-born physicist, most famous for his theory of relativity, was on a lecture tour in Japan. A Japanese courier arrived at the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo to deliver Einstein a message.


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

Coral reefs in Florida Keys hit hard this hurricane season, but there are signs of recoveryOut on the water's surface, floating above the site of a coral nursery was the first sign of trouble: a tangled mass of line, buoys, lobster traps, and debris.  A coral restoration team from Florida's Mote Marine Laboratory was checking on its underwater nursery for the first time since Hurricane Irma brought 140-mph winds to the Keys, and things didn't look promising. The team of scientists grows coral, which is then planted out on reefs decimated by global warming and other human abuses. SEE ALSO: Before and after photos show Hurricane Irma's devastation in the Caribbean "Right off the bat we thought, 'Oh it's going to be completely destroyed," said Erich Bartels, a Mote staff scientist. While the infrastructure, including the PVC trees where corals hang like drying laundry, survived the storm, much of the vibrant coral within the 60-by-80 meter site did not. Whipped up sand and tangled fishing gear had harmed the delicate coral. A staghorn coral tree prior to Irma.Image: Joe Berg / Way Down Video via Mote Marine Labaratory  A coral tree post-Irma.Image: Erich Bartels/Mote Marine Laboratory The Category 4 storm left the Florida Keys bruised and battered in early September, but it's not just the land, and its buildings, roads, and trees, that took a beating. Under the sea, the depleted coral reefs are also worse for wear, along with the underwater nurseries conservationists are growing in hopes of replenishing the Keys' once healthy reefs. The reefs are vital for the Florida coastline because the calcium carbonate structures act as a buffer from powerful waves. They're also important for the economy, as the sea life the reefs support helps feed the state and reel in tourists.  Globally, restoring coral reefs is taking on new urgency as more frequent and severe coral bleaching events kill reefs that are less tolerant of unusually high water temperatures.  "We can only begin to imagine how much more severely Irma would have damaged the Florida Keys without our coral reef shield," Mote's public relations manager Shelby Isaacson wrote in an email. Significant amounts of lobster trap lines got tangled in the Mote Marine Laboratory's coral trees, snagging other debris such as uprooted mangrove roots.Image: Erich Bartels/Mote Marine LaboratoryRestoration groups like Mote and the Coral Restoration Foundation (CRF), which had evacuated the area before landfall, are just starting to get back to work and do preliminary assessments of their nurseries and the reefs they support.  "It’s been tough to go back and see some of the reefs, because they’ve just been completely changed," said Jessica Levy, reef restoration program manager at the Coral Restoration Foundation (CRF). "The sites that we’ve seen are pretty barren, they've lost out-planted corals, they've lost natural corals, a lot of the soft corals. We’ve seen the ledge of the reef just collapse." A coral tree entangled in debris.Image: Erich Bartels/Mote Marine Laboratory The distinct line of bright, white reef was exposed during the hurricane.Image: Jessica Levy/Coral Restoration Foundation While the coral at the Mote nursery off Big Pine Key saw high mortality, two of CRF's underwater nurseries off Tavernier and Key Largo fared better. Still, CRF doesn't know the fate of two other production nurseries farther south because weather conditions have made it difficult to check.  Coral restoration groups have been working for years in Florida to combat decades of damage to the reefs, some of it, like coral bleaching, caused by climate change, some by overfishing, anchoring, polluting, and pathogens. Similar restoration projects are happening around the globe, and perhaps the most well-known is set along Australia's Great Barrier Reef, large swaths of which have been left bone-white and stricken with disease due to rising water temperatures. This was the first time both Mote and CRF's nurseries faced such a powerful storm. They had weathered tropical storms before, but nothing like Irma. The fact that their infrastructure survived, even if all the corals didn't, was heartening. "We were in the direct path of the eye, we were in what they call the 'dirty side.' It was about as big of a test that we could be given," Bartels said.  Mote scientists and volunteers planted 500 Staghorn Coral on Hope Reef on June 27, 2017, a few months before Irma hit.Image: Conor Goulding/Mote Marine LaboratoryAnother bright spot for Mote was its Summerland Key land-based nursery and gene bank, which opened this year and was built to resist Category 5 storms. The Elizabeth Moore International Center for Coral Reef Research & Restoration protected 30,000 coral fragments from the storm.  The coral living in shallow, long water tanks called raceways outside the facility were brought indoors just before Irma. Generators helped control the temperatures so the coral did not get exposed to hot water that could cause coral bleaching. While equipment left outside got beat up, the building — and coral sheltered inside — survived. A tray of coral fragments growing in one of Mote's outdoor raceways.Image: Mote Marine Laboratory Damage seen outside Mote's land-based nursery.Image: Mote marine laboratory David Vaughan, executive director of Mote's Elizabeth Moore International Center for Coral Reef Research & Restoration, dives in a tank fixing coral fragments after Irma.Image: Mote Marine LaboratoryMote had aimed to plant 25,000 of its nursery corals on reefs this year, while CRF planned for 10,000. Both projects may be delayed a bit due to the hurricane, but the organizations are still optimistic about accomplishing their goals.  "I think at this point this work is needed now more than ever because we’ve seen what storms like this can do," Levy said. "This isn’t like we took a hit, we’re gonna stop. It's we took a hit, and we’re gonna keep going." Both Mote and Coral Restoration Foundation are fundraising to rebuild after Irma.  WATCH: 5-foot robotic snake is designed to find the source of pollution in contaminated water  


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

'It's Been a Rollercoaster.' Shawn Johnson East Reveals Miscarriage in Emotional VideoShe had a miscarriage two days after the couple found out they were pregnant


10/22/2017   Wired Science
Studies of the energy-harvesting proteins in primitive cells suggest that key features of photosynthesis might have evolved a billion years earlier than scientists thought.
10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

All 5 Former U.S. Presidents Team Up to Raise $31 Million for Hurricane VictimsIt was a rare moment to see them all on stage together


10/22/2017   Yahoo! Science

China Races to Catch Up to SpaceXBut how do you beat a company that launches half the world's satellites?


10/21/2017   Wired Science
_Paperclips_ is a simple clicker game that manages to turn you into an artificial intelligence run amok.
10/21/2017   Wired Science
For the first time in human history and modern science, researchers have detected ripples in spacetime produced by the violent impact of two dense neutron stars
10/20/2017   Wired Science
I have no idea how Aquaman got into the middle of a fight in the sky. He's not supposed to be able to fly.
10/20/2017   Wired Science
Scholars have ways to think about "problematic" artists and their work. But what about science and equally problematic scientists?
10/20/2017   Wired Science
A new study elucidating the mechanisms by which blood glucose fuels tumors is not the kind of science on which to build a diet.
10/19/2017   Wired Science
Welcome to the supremely fascinating world of object reentry risk analysis.
10/19/2017   Wired Science
The city has to shore up its seawalls and modify its sewer systems to fight back rising tides. And it's suing Big Petroleum over the bill.
10/19/2017   Wired Science
Autonomous construction equipment has one big advantage over self-driving cars: They move around a relatively static, structured environment.
10/18/2017   Wired Science
Hospitals and med schools use fake corpses to teach anatomy, and the most lifelike model is the SynDaver Patient.
10/18/2017   Wired Science
Scientists descend on the Boiling River in Yellowstone to hunt for Naegleria fowleri, the brain-eating amoeba that kills 97 percent of the humans it infects.
10/17/2017   Wired Science
Hiroshi Ishi­guro builds androids. Beautiful, realistic, uncannily convincing human replicas. His quest? Untangle the ineffable nature of human connection.
10/17/2017   Wired Science
An artificially intelligent therapist named Ellie helps members of the military open up about their mental health.
10/17/2017   Wired Science
In their new book, scientist Kelly Weinersmith and *SMBC* cartoonist Zach Weinersmith give a wild glimpse into a future that may or may not involve space elevators and brain-computer interfaces.
10/17/2017   Wired Science
Oxitec has spent the last six years seeking US regulatory approval for its Zika-fighting GM mosquitoes. Now they're the EPA's problem.
10/16/2017   Wired Science
Is there a physical reason why a planet might have ended up looking like some sort of fat, intergalactic caterpillar?
10/16/2017   Wired Science
Scientists detected their fifth gravitational wave in August, and announced it today. But keeping the discoveries quiet is getting harder and harder.
10/16/2017   Wired Science
At the beginning of the month, Vice President Mike Pence announced that the US, at long last, will go back to the moon. Well ... some day.
10/15/2017   Wired Science
Repeating radio bursts are among the most mysterious phenomena in the universe. A new theory explores how some of their puzzling properties can be explained by galactic lenses made of plasma.

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